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I explain why NC decision to reject fed $ for Medicaid costs NC businesses $65 million+

When Governor McCrory and the NC General Assembly rejected accepting federal money to expand Medicaid health coverage to families of four making under $29,000 a year, many people thought this decision just affected low income workers.  Wrong.  It affects NC businesses too and I explain why in this clip this morning from the Triangle Business Journal’s “Health Care Today” forum:

4 Comments


  1. Doug

    May 3, 2013 at 10:43 am

    Plus the already bloated costs costing us $135 million than expected. This program is ripe for fixing…or hopefully for more cutting.

    http://abclocal.go.com/wtvd/story?section=news/local&id=9087864

  2. Doug

    May 3, 2013 at 11:01 am

    And you have to take the $248 million we are going in the hole on for this Medicaid scheme and then consider the fact that Medicaid has no effect on health vs. being uninsured. Here is the study in the NE Journal of Medicine. This does not bode well for the argument that we should have the Medicaid system…much less expand it to one more person.

    http://www.nejm.org/doi/full/10.1056/NEJMsa1212321

    Medicaid is definitely an overall ineffective drain that increases costs due to government intervention. Studies like this just put one more nail in the coffin.

  3. gregflynn

    May 3, 2013 at 11:40 am

    Such a cherry picker. Keep reading:

    Medicaid coverage decreased the probability of a positive screening for depression (?9.15 percentage points; 95% confidence interval, ?16.70 to ?1.60; P=0.02), increased the use of many preventive services, and nearly eliminated catastrophic out-of-pocket medical expenditures.

    How Medicaid affects adult health

    In 2011, researchers released results from an initial related study, which found that after about one year of coverage, the lottery enrollees in Oregon’s Medicaid program did, in fact, use more medical care, suffer from less financial strain, and report themselves to be in better health. The current study augments that one by analyzing a longer time period and adding clinical health data to the self-reported information.

    The “hole” was artificially created by the hubris of a legislature that wanted to declare by fiat that medical costs would not rise.

  4. Doug

    May 6, 2013 at 10:27 am

    Woo hoo. hundreds of millions to detect depression. Well lets put all of us on that scheme, all will be better in Liberalland.

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