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Why courts matter: Supreme Court may redefine the fight against racial discrimination

Richard Wolf reminds us in this piece in USA Today that, as the U.S. Supreme Court winds down this term, two cases that could redefine how we address racial discrimination in this country are pending for decision:   Fisher v. University of Texas, on affirmative action, and Shelby County v. Holder, on the viability of Section 5 of the Voting Rights Act (requiring certain states and municipalities — including 40 counties in North Carolina –to get voting changes pre-approved by the Justice Department).

As Wolf puts it:  “The Supreme Court may be on the verge of declaring victory in the fight against racial discrimination.”

 

2 Comments


  1. Doug

    May 9, 2013 at 10:44 am

    It will be a certain day of progress when/if many of these racial preferences are struck down in this nation. We have evolved a lot from the days of segregation and racial discrimination, the laws now need to reflect that fact.

  2. gregflynn

    May 9, 2013 at 10:53 am

    Speaking as a white guy who is sometimes mistaken for a “like minded conservative” I can assure you that racial discrimination is very much alive.

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