NC Budget and Tax Center

What does the vote on the House Tax Plan mean?

The House is taking a vote on the tax plan that was rushed through committees this week with little time for discussion of the real impact. This new House plan, like all the other plans proposed, will undermine North Carolina’s future by shifting taxes from the wealthy onto everyone else and will leave the state unable to make its most important investments.

Our full analysis of what this will mean for taxpayers can be accessed here. What does this tell us about the vote that House members are moments away from taking?

  • The top five percent will get tax cuts while the bottom 95 percent of taxpayers see their taxes increase, on average. This analysis is the most reliable way to assess what will happen to the population overall under this plan. It doesn’t cherry pick taxpayers with certain filing characteristics but summarizes the diversity of experiences under the House tax plan to tell us what the impact will be for a taxpayer on average in each income group.
  • The largest benefits of this plan overwhelmingly go to the top one percent. Millionaires would receive a tax cut of nearly $9,000. In fact, the small number of millionaires in this state would receive almost 40 percent of the total income tax cut that results from flattening the rate and removing the cap on charitable contributions.
  • The so-called “protections” for low- and middle-income taxpayers are ineffective and poorly targeted at those who are hurt by this tax plan. It will fail to shield those taxpayers from changing sales tax to services. The House tax plan combined with the end of the state’s Earned Income Tax Credit will raise taxes for taxpayers with an average income of $12,000 by 0.7 percent, while cutting taxes for taxpayers with an average income of $940,000 by -1 percent.
  • The House tax plan will cost the state $1.6 billion over five years. That means fewer dollars to invest in the foundations for economic growth—like K-12 and higher education—at a time when spending is already at historic lows.

Tax cuts for the wealthy paired with tax hikes for everyone else will not help North Carolina’s economy. But it will cost us our most important priorities.

2 Comments


  1. Bruce Wiley

    June 7, 2013 at 1:32 pm

    I’d like to see the full analysis. A single page PDF doesn’t show the methodology. I’d like to understand it better.

  2. June Kimmel

    June 7, 2013 at 1:36 pm

    Alexandra, this morning’s article in the Clt. Observer says that in an effort to minimize effects on low- and middle-income families, the House plan will double the standard exemption to $12,000 for a married couple or $6,000 for a single filer, “making it one of the most generous in the nation.” Also it would double the child tax credit for families making less than $100,000 a year to $250. (This sounds like practically nothing to me???) Reading read my 2012 return – it looks as if a Head of Household received a $5150 standard deduction. That would be probably $1000 more than the single deduction.
    How does that mitigate the increases due to sales tax, or changes in income tax in the House bill?
    My NC taxable income was $11,148. My tax was $612.
    The emphasis on cutting revenue for the state is so TABOR-like, that it is indistinguishable.

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