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Recap: Monday at the Supreme Court

Here’s quick run down of today’s action in the U.S. Supreme Court, courtesy of AP, plus links to the decisions and orders:

— Struck down, by a 7-2 vote, Arizona’s proof-of-citizenship law that asks would-be voters for additional documentation before allowing them to register using a federal form designed to make signing up easier. (Arizona v. Inter Tribal Council)

— Ruled 5-3 that agreements between the makers of name-brand and generic drugs to delay the generics’ availability can be illegal, an outcome cheered by consumer groups. (FTC v. Actavis)

— Held 5-4 that prosecutors in some instances may use a suspect’s silence at an early stage of a criminal investigation against him — before the suspect has been arrested or informed of his constitutional rights. (Salinas v. Texas)

— Decided 5-4 that judges may not increase mandatory minimum prison terms when sentencing defendants unless the facts justifying the increase have been found by a jury. (Alleyne v. U.S.)

— Barred lawyers, in another 5-4 ruling, from obtaining state driver license records to recruit clients, saying the practice is prohibited by a federal law aimed at shielding motor vehicle information. (Maracich v. Spears)

— Agreed to decide in its next term a new dispute involving race, whether federal housing law requires proof of intentional discrimination. (Mt. Holly v. Mt. Holly Gardens Citizens)

— Said it would review a state court ruling upholding a $1.24 million defamation judgment against a Wisconsin airline that reported one of its pilots was potentially dangerous, despite a post-9/11 law that encourages airlines to report potential safety threats to federal officials. (Air Wisconsin v. Hoeper)

The court will next hand down decisions in some of the 14 merits cases still awaiting decision this term — including highly anticipated and perhaps historical cases involving affirmative action, marriage equality and voting rights — on Thursday, June 20.

2 Comments


  1. david esmay

    June 17, 2013 at 2:50 pm

    Glad to see Republican voter suppression struck down, to the GOP, minorities aren’t people, but corporations are.

  2. Doug

    June 18, 2013 at 10:52 am

    The only one of consequence will really open the spigot for the democrat fraud machine. Hopefully the republicans can catch up and begin registering the illegals now, maybe cash in on some of that voter population now that it is open season.

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