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New national study: Economic mobility is lowest in the Southeast

There’s new confirmation today that it’s time, once and for all, for North Carolina politicians to ditch their absurd obsession with being “competitive” with neighboring southeastern states.

According to a new report described here, the Southeast is the nation’s backwater for economic mobility.

“The study — based on millions of anonymous earnings records and being released this week by a team of top academic economists — is the first with enough data to compare upward mobility across metropolitan areas. These comparisons provide some of the most powerful evidence so far about the factors that seem to drive people’s chances of rising beyond the station of their birth, including education, family structure and the economic layout of metropolitan areas.

Climbing the income ladder occurs less often in the Southeast and industrial Midwest, the data shows, with the odds notably low in Atlanta, Charlotte, Memphis, Raleigh, Indianapolis, Cincinnati and Columbus. By contrast, some of the highest rates occur in the Northeast, Great Plains and West, including in New York, Boston, Salt Lake City, Pittsburgh, Seattle and large swaths of California and Minnesota.”

3 Comments


  1. Doug

    July 22, 2013 at 1:28 pm

    Just because the liberal democrat party has given up years ago does not mean it is not a reasonable goal to try to be competitive with other states.

  2. ML

    July 22, 2013 at 3:32 pm

    Cute straw man Doug…who are we competingwith? SC? Alabama? Mississipi? so you’d rather be the best team in the minor leagues than the best team in the majors?

    We’ve proven to be competitive despite not playing their way but now we want to be “competitive” with states we already put to shame? That’s just nonsense.

  3. Doug

    July 23, 2013 at 1:42 pm

    Not sure what your point is. We need to be competitive among all states. A low tax and regulation environment that promotes companies to want to come here without bribery is a start. Taxation and spending priorites that are in line with sound economic practices so that companies and entrepreneurs want to start and keep their businesses here and as a result hire people here in the state so that the middle class benefits from the prosperity. To achieve this, you have to do what the NCGA has done so far, reform the burdensome tax code on business and individuals, begin cutting bloated programs in the government, place reasonable controls on elections and in general clean up the mess that 140 years of democrat mismanagement had put into place to make us an uncompetitive backwards state in the first place.

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