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House of Raeford closing tomorrow, 950 will lose jobs

Tomorrow will be the last day of operation for the turkey processing plant at the House of Raeford in Hoke County.

The plant closure, a business decision made by the company because of declining public interest in turkey, will put an estimated 950 people out of work in a largely rural part of the state.

The newly-unemployed will receive some severance from the company (the amount wasn’t disclosed) but will then be subject to the state’s new rules on unemployment, which limit both the amount and length of time workers can collect unemployment.

Check back with N.C Policy Watch in coming days, as we document what this large plant closure will mean to the small community of Raeford and surrounding counties where many of the plant’s workers hail from.

Read our previous article (click here) about the closure and challenges facing these workers as they attempt to find new jobs in a part of the state already contending with high unemployment.

3 Comments

  1. Debbie Salzer

    July 31, 2013 at 8:07 pm

    The people of Hoke County deserve jobs. This is very sad.

  2. Russell Scott Day

    July 31, 2013 at 9:31 pm

    The regulation in the unemployment benefits awards that dictates that none of the money given can be used to start companies is wrong headed and needs to be changed.
    Those of the Raeford company closing who might have concepts for the area that could create jobs for themselves while on unemployment deserve their business plans to be aided in all honesty.
    The rest of the unemployed need to be evacuated.
    Many Many of those who live in North Carolina need to face refugee status and move right away. If they love the Confederate States they may decide to stay, though the Confederate States were poor before Civil War, and also afterwards, and as long as they have been Confederate in reality like Mississippi. So if you like the Confederate States of America, and want to stay in the Red States, expect that the majority will be poor as they were before the war, and were also afterwards till briefly they accepted Federal benefits.

  3. Alex

    August 1, 2013 at 7:16 am

    I’ve seen some strange postings on this site, but this one may win the award.