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Report documents path of NC public ed from 2006-13

Dr. Bill Anderson of the nonprofit MeckEd — a pro-public education group in Charlotte — published a fascinating, chart-and-graph-filled editorial/report this week about the status of North Carolina’s public schools. You owe it to yourself to take some time to review it.

“North Carolina was once considered a leader of K-12 public education in the Southeast. A few years back, during the tenure of Governor Jim Hunt, who was referred to on the national stage as the “Education Governor,” teacher salaries, academic achievement, and accountability increased significantly. The unfortunate reality of change, along with an extreme and prolonged recession, has resulted in painful adjustments due to significant reductions in education funding. 

This editorial is intended to provide an accurate and objective picture of these changes since 2006. It provides data on student population growth, academic achievement, the reduction of full-time instructional personnel, teacher salaries and how N.C. fares when compared to national teacher pay scales. It also shows what the outlook could be for traditional public schools in a state that once valued public education as an investment in the future. So much has changed and is being “reformed” very rapidly this summer. Some legislators believe our public schools are “broken” and need to “be fixed.” Hopefully, by understanding these developments with annual data points, the citizens and legislators of our great state will now have an accurate understanding of how far North Carolina has slipped in regard to funding and valuing the importance of public education.”

 Click here to read the entire piece.

One Comment


  1. Alex

    August 3, 2013 at 5:00 pm

    “By PAUL WISEMAN, AP Economics Writer

    WASHINGTON — The 162,000 jobs the economy added in July were a disappointment. The quality of the jobs was even worse.

    A disproportionate number of the added jobs were part-time or low-paying — or both.

    Part-time work accounted for more than 65 percent of the positions employers added in July. Low-paying retailers, restaurants and bars supplied more than half July’s job gain.

    “You’re getting jobs added, but they might not be the best-quality job,” says John Canally, an economist with LPL Financial in Boston.

    So far this year, low-paying industries have provided 61 percent of the nation’s job growth, even though these industries represent just 39 percent of overall U.S. jobs.”
    ,
    Basically, we’re becoming a nation of hamburger flippers, so doing things the same old way in education is not getting us anywhere. The notion that huge amounts of money spent on education will drive job growth is probably incorrect. All you are producing is a bunch of frustrated kids way over qualified for the few jobs available. When you have a government that is clueless on the economy, it is crazy to continue the huge expense of expanding universities, and turning out B.A’s with no particular job skills.No one wants to admit it ,but the entire process is an awful failure.

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