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Hagan calls for DOJ review of new voting law

U.S. Sen. Kay Hagan sent a letter today to Attorney General Eric Holder, calling for a Justice Department review of the voting law signed by Gov. Pat McCrory yesterday.

In the letter, Hagan identifies the many provisions of the law which, she says, may “restrict the ability of minorities, seniors, students, the disabled and low- and middle-income citizens to exercise their constitutional right to vote.”

The full letter is here.

14 Comments

  1. Doug

    August 13, 2013 at 2:12 pm

    Not sure Holder wants to get on that flaming trail to defeat. He has already been a failure at so many things he will probably elect to stay in the shadows. Plus it is funny how Hagan says most NC residents are against the bill when there is around 70% support for it. I guess she majored in liberal math.

  2. Jim Wiseman

    August 13, 2013 at 2:18 pm

    I’ll say it again: the only reason to oppose voter ID is to promote voter fraud and steal elections.

  3. Mike

    August 13, 2013 at 3:13 pm

    No, reasons to oppose the bill include shortening the days of early voting, the bill stops same day registration, will end pre-registration for 17 year olds and for 16 yr olds. It eliminates straight party voting. It prohibits a county from extending voting time EVEN if there are extraordinary circumstances. So, if the power goes out, oh well. If they re late to open or machines malfunction, too bad. It moves the presidential primary to an earlier date. Allows people to give more money to candidates. Cuts early voting time by a week, eliminates same day registration, allows anyone in your county and not just your precinct the right to question your vote, will not allow college students to use their student ID cards that have photos, and doesn’t require a candidate to endorse an ad for themselves for office.

  4. Artie

    August 13, 2013 at 3:22 pm

    I’ll say it again: the only reason to support Voter ID is to suppress voter participation and steal elections.

  5. Alex

    August 13, 2013 at 3:41 pm

    Why in the world is it so blooming hard to produce an ID for voting when they are required for almost everything else? People find it to be very easy when making applications for free money or programs !

  6. Skeptic

    August 13, 2013 at 4:02 pm

    Doug-

    PPP just found that 50% oppose this bill but only 39% support it. I guess you majored in conservative “math.”

  7. Linda M

    August 13, 2013 at 4:12 pm

    My concern about the Voter ID law is not that having a valid photo ID is a good idea, but with how quickly it passed and with such insignificant data numbers. In 2002, there were 12 cases of voter fraud in NC. In 2004 – 37 cases. In 2005 – 7 cases. A Raleigh News and Observer article reported: “In 2008, which saw a sharp rise in voting when 4.2 million North Carolinians went to the polls, there were 235 voting felonies, 30 cases of double voting, 23 cases of noncitizens voting, five cases of absentee voting fraud and 16 cases of fraudulent registration forms turned over to the district attorney, according to the elections board.” So, there were 309 cases (cases, not actual indictments), a rise proportional to the increase in voters. That percentage of fraud in 2008 was .0075%! With such a miniscule proportion of fraud, it seems we do NOT have a voter fraud problem in NC! Would 309 fraudulent votes statewide have changed any election results? Yet with this law, more than 500,000 NC voters and students are impacted. That number definitely could change election results. Other states have forked over $6 million in the first year to pay for new state photo IDs. Why should we be taxed to implement a program that isn’t even necessary? Where’s the data? Without data, what was the rationale for creating and passing this law?

  8. Doug

    August 13, 2013 at 4:26 pm

    Skeptic,
    PPP is of course going to come up with that….they are well known as a leftist polling agency only doing work for democrats and progressives. In other words they get their marching orders and produce a poll to fit the premise.

  9. Doug

    August 13, 2013 at 4:37 pm

    Also, this National Review piece has interesting quotes that expose their bias:

    “We’re absolutely rooting in the race. We don’t want Richard Burr to get reelected,”

    That along with their name attempting to mirror actual non-biased entities is at best an attempt to gain legitimacy where there is none.

    http://www.nationalreview.com/articles/243447/public-policy-polling-or-controlling-jim-geraghty

  10. Doug

    August 13, 2013 at 4:42 pm

    And just so you can split the difference, here is the Civitas polling on overall voter ID issues. It is a bit dated but most of the favorable issues are included in the recent bill:

    http://www.nccivitas.org/2013/civitas-releases-poll-on-nc-voting-issues/

  11. Doug

    August 14, 2013 at 10:51 am

    A couple more links discrediting the push poll PPP performed. Looks like they did a poor job of being impartial in wording their questions:

    http://voterintegrityproject.com/partisan-push-polling/

    NC Poll that contradicts it….not Civitas
    http://www.elon.edu/e-net/Article/60271

  12. Ricky Leung

    August 14, 2013 at 11:28 am

    National Review, NC Civitas adn Voter Integrity Project are all heavily conservative sources.

    The Elon Poll was conducted in 2012 and not specific to the bill that was just passed. The Elon Poll addresses only photo identification, the link you shared also does not show the specific questions or methodology so we have no idea how the question was asked.

    The PPP poll is here: http://www.publicpolicypolling.com/main/2013/08/north-carolinians-oppose-voting-bill-signed-today.html

    It also lists all the questions and methodology. It looks to ask specifically about this one bill. So it’s not necessarily contradictory because it’s asking about different things at different times within a different context.

  13. Doug

    August 14, 2013 at 2:33 pm

    Ricky,
    Take the average of all of them though….PPP is at least as heavily progressive for example……and you get closer to the truth. That a majority of people approve of the voter ID bill.

  14. Doug

    August 14, 2013 at 2:35 pm

    And putting that far ranging question as the main one…..do the people approve of all but one issue for example? That one question they asked on the issue is very very leading at best….