Lunch Links

Your Tuesday Lunch Links

It’s my first time posting a Lunch Links blog, and I’m pretty excited to take you all with me on my midday Sandwich-and-Internet excursion!

This past Sunday, the New York Times ran an opinion piece by the makers of the documentary American Teacher  that considers “The High Cost of Low Teacher Salaries.” The authors make a compelling point about how we view the good men and women who fight on the front lines. “We don’t say, ‘It’s these lazy soldiers and their bloated benefits plans! That’s why we haven’t done better in Afghanistan!’.”

Yet the opposite happens in education. “When we don’t like the way our students score on international standardized tests, we blame the teachers. When we don’t like the way particular schools perform, we blame the teachers and restrict their resources.” Read the entire story here.

Valerie Strauss is an education blogger for The Washington Post. Back in February, she posted a letter from a retiring high school teacher to all college professors, warning them of what they can expect of their students who, for the better part of their educations, have been subject to the provisions contained in the No Child Left Behind legislation.

In a nutshell? Excessive testing has created a dearth of higher-order thinking skills for our students. Read the full letter here.

If you’re like me (college educated and in your mid-30s), there’s a good chance you have student loan debt. So I was a little peeved when I read Libby Nelson’s story on Politico about how top-dollar law schools are exploiting a loophole in the public service loan forgiveness program so that their graduates never have to pay back a dollar of their student loans.

Did you hear about the Charlotte teacher who wrote a letter to Thom Tillis? Justin Ashley had to choose between a career at Burger King or a career as a teacher, and the NC Teaching Fellows program made the latter possible.

Ashley now has a petition going, which asks Governor McCrory to spend one day teaching in his classroom. It now has more than 1,200 signatures.

Finally, today I came across this story in the The Chronicle of Higher Education about what it means to be an English major.

“The English major reads because, as rich as the one life he has may be, one life is not enough. He reads not to see the world through the eyes of other people but effectively to become other people.”

And now I just want to put down the Internet and pick up a book right this minute.

Back to work!

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