Uncategorized

What lawmakers OUGHT to be doing today

As Clayton Henkel notes below, the General Assembly returns to Raleigh today to override the Governor’s vetoes of a pair of bills dealing with immigrant workers and drug testing of public benefits applicants.

In response, the good folks at Public School First NC released a statement this morning that highlights what lawmakers ought to be doing now that they’re back in the Capital City:

PUBLIC SCHOOLS FIRST NC URGES LEGISLATURE TO REINSTATE FUNDS FOR PUBLIC EDUCATION
Despite Promises of Job Growth, Teaching Positions Cut Across North Carolina

Raleigh, NC—September 3, 2013— As the General Assembly convenes for a special session, Public Schools First NC urges legislators to acknowledge the drastic budget impacts already, affecting public education and to use this opportunity to restore funding. The predicted consequences of these cuts—the loss of teacher and teacher assistant positions, increases to class size, inadequate instructional supplies, and the trimming of special programs—comes on the heels of promises by elected officials to promote job growth.

“When an economy improves, it is typically viewed as a good time to invest in public education to help further spur prosperity,” said Yevonne Brannon, Chair, Public Schools First NC. “As the U.S. economy shows signs of recovery, it is surprising that our state legislature is not picking up on those cues and investing in our schools. Instead, tax cuts are being handed out to the wealthy while teachers and teacher assistants are struggling to make ends meet—with many either leaving the profession or going to neighboring states where they can earn a living wage.”

Losses due to budget cuts being felt statewide are compounded by the fact that student enrollment in public schools continues to increase. And in many cases, the full force of the cuts are masked by school districts that are dipping into local funds to compensate for some of the state shortfall.

A few examples of the impact of the budget cuts on local school districts include:

Teaching positions

Iredell-Statesville Schools will eliminate 4 6 teacher positions 

Burke County will eliminate 43.5 teaching positions 

• Cleveland County will eliminate 50-60 teaching positions

Read the rest of the statement by clicking here.

 

 

One Comment

  1. LayintheSmakDown

    September 3, 2013 at 4:23 pm

    Here is a good question….how can something be reinatated that was never there in the first place….or maybe we reinstate to the last democrat budget that was out there? I doubt they would want to go down to those funding levels.