Tracking the Cuts: The Dismantling of Our Public Schools

Vance County Schools lose eight teaching positions, 12 teacher assistants

trackingCuts-web-600Add Vance County Schools to the list — they’ve had to cut eight teaching positions and 12 teacher assistant positions for 2013-14.

Terri Hedrick, Public Information Officer for VCS, reports:

  • Cut teaching positions by eight positions
  • Cut teacher assistant positions by 12 positions
  • No layoffs have occurred; through attrition the teacher assistants have been placed in other positions; we simply did not fill eight vacant teaching positions
  • We were cut $572,643 in state funds for teaching positions
  • We were cut $468,134 in state funds for teacher assistant positions
  • We were cut $105,212 in state funds for instructional support positions (placed in other positions, i.e., assistant principals/lead teachers)
  • We were cut $32,395 in state funds for classroom materials
  • Our total state budget cuts from last year to the new school year totaled $333,257

Check out our growing list of school districts that have been forced to make difficult cuts for the 2013-14 school year.

2 Comments


  1. LayintheSmakDown

    September 16, 2013 at 4:28 pm

    All these phantom cuts….while the high paid administrators get to keep reaping in their perks and spending from their slush funds contained in their fund balances……you guys.

  2. LayintheSmakDown

    September 16, 2013 at 4:43 pm

    And also, note that they were able to increase their funding for security officers.

    http://www.hendersondispatch.com/x1463429304/Vance-County-avoids-increase-in-taxes

    One thing you never note in these posts, are these positions actual “cuts” meaning there was a teacher/classroom that existed in prior year, and there is now an empty classroom with a teacher. My guess is that these are the usual budget ploy of we asked for 100 teachers, 20 of them are new, we got 12 new teachers, so we had a “cut” of 8. I doubt you guys (you like that greggylou dont you?) ever actually research before regurgitating the school system press release, which is what is called journalism these days.

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