Uncategorized

Price: North Carolina stopping WIC vouchers for two days “really wrong”

Congressman David Price, speaking to a group of reporters today at an on-the-record lunch in downtown Raleigh, said that he still had concerns about North Carolina temporarily suspended issuing WIC vouchers in the course of the federal government shutdown.

“It seems like they were eager to cut them off,” Price said, comparing North Carolina’s decision to suspend issuing new formula and nutritional food vouchers to other states.

Price is a Democrat from Chapel Hill.

Price

Rep. David Price (D-N.C.)

N.C. Health and Human Services Secretary Aldona Wos announced on Oct. 8 that her department would stop issuing new vouchers for food and infant formula because WIC (Special Supplemental Program for Women, Infants and Children) had exhausted federal funding and couldn’t continue as a result of the governmental shutdown. It was the only state to do so, with other states leaning on U.S Department of Agriculture contingency funds and promises of repayment to keep the program running.

The program was restored the evening of Oct 10, after N.C. Policy Watch reported (click here) that North Carolina was the only state to suspend the benefits with other states leaning on U.S. Department of Agriculture offers of contingency dollars. Wos sent out a release saying the agency was using donated formula coupons and other monies to cover the cost of the WIC program during the course of the federal shutdown.

DHHS spokesman Ricky Diaz told another media outlet that the USDA-provided funding was not enough to cover North Carolina’s expenses, and it wasn’t until last Thursday that the agency was able to secure enough funding.

The shutdown ended yesterday, and with it programs like WIC were restored to their normal operations. Price said he has not received a response to a letter he and two other Democratic members of the North Carolina’s congressional delegation sent to Gov. Pat McCrory, a Republican, with questions about the WIC and Temporary Assistance for Needy Families, a welfare-type benefits program that provides emergency help to families.

North Carolina stopped taking TANF applications Monday, a few days before the federal shutdown ended.

On Friday, Price questioned why the federal government’s assurance that states would be reimbursed was good enough for 49 other states, but not North Carolina.

“Something’s really wrong here,” Price said. “Really wrong.”

One Comment


  1. david esmay

    October 21, 2013 at 8:59 am

    “Really wrong”, the same can be said for every conservative idea put forth over the last 32 years.

Check Also

UNC Board of Governors face protest, chooses new board chair and interim president

It was a busy day at the final ...

Top Stories from NCPW

  • News
  • Commentary

When the N.C. Senate elected Tom Fetzer to the UNC Board of Governors in March, it was widely seen a [...]

The 12 minutes spent on the phone with Duke Energy customer service shed no light on how — or if — c [...]

Crumbling ceilings. Failing air conditioning and heating systems. Broken down school buses. Mold inf [...]

This story has been updated with comments from Jim Womack, who did not respond earlier to questions. [...]

Last week, the General Assembly announced which legislators will serve on the Joint Legislative Task [...]

The latest effort in Washington to repeal and not actually replace the Affordable Care Act has a dif [...]

Conservative group “reviewing” bigoted attacks; funding from major NC corporations implicated Nearly [...]

5---number of days since Senators Bill Cassidy and Lindsey Graham unveiled a new proposal to repeal [...]

Featured | Special Projects

NC Budget 2017
The maze of the NC Budget is complex. Follow the stories to follow the money.
Read more


NC Redistricting 2017
New map, new districts, new lawmakers. Here’s what you need to know about gerrymandering in NC.
Read more