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Thursday lunch links

If you’re planning on heading out for a fast food meal today, you might want to check out this petition being advanced by the good folks at the Campaign for America’s Future entitled “Tell McDonald’s to stop buying luxury jets until they pay their workers a l;iving wage.” As the post notes:

“More than half of low-wage workers employed by the largest U.S. fast-food restaurants earn so little that they must rely on public assistance to get by.

McDonald’s is the worst offender, costing taxpayers $1.2 billion in poverty benefits for its employees. McDonald’s claims that they operate on razor-thin profit margins and can’t pay a living wage.

Yet they announced they had bought yet another brand new $35 million corporate jet for their fleet.”

And speaking of fat cats living large while others go hungry, Sam Pizzigatti has a great story at the website “Too Much” about mushrooming inequality and how “a tiny tax on global personal wealth over $1 million could ensure that no child anywhere on the planet has to live in extreme poverty.”

And speaking of hunger, this new report from the Budget and Tax Center’s Prosperity Watch project makes eminently clear than it will take more than turnip greens to solve our state’s terrible and obscene food insecurity problem. As the report explains:  “North Carolina ranks 4th among states for its high level of food insecurity, nearly 1 in 6 North Carolinians has difficulty putting food on the table.”

And speaking of budget and tax policy and the nation’s ever-more-bloated plutocracy, the good folks at N.C. PIRG are calling on Senators Burr and Hagan to close corporate tax loopholes by supporting the “Stop Tax Haven Abuse Act.” They put it this way:

“As Congress debates our spending priorities and the budget this fall, one common sense way of raising revenue is by closing unjustified tax loopholes that corporations and very wealthy individuals use to avoid paying their taxes on U.S. profits. These tax havens cost the public an estimated $150 billion a year, and this bill would aim to close the most egregious loopholes and provide an alternative path for Congress that better protects public priorities, such as public health programs, education funds for low-income students, and emergency unemployment assistance programs.” 

The PIRG people also put out an excellent report out earlier this year that explains “The Hidden Cost of Offshore Tax Havens.”

Finally, speaking of “Havens,” here is the video of the famous Woodstock performance of the late great Richie that will hopefully perk up your afternoon:

 

 

One Comment


  1. NitWitCharmer

    October 24, 2013 at 1:00 pm

    Our government currently accounts for 40% of GDP leaving only 60% for you, me, our neighbors and everyone else you know. It’s a shame some of us wish to squabble over that 60%.

    Imagine how much better off we’ed all be if 30% of America’s GDP was returned to the people. It’s easy if you try….

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