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Dispelling myths about teacher tenure

In case you missed it, Charlotte lawyer Luke Largess had an excellent letter to the editor published in the Charlotte Observer yesterday on the oft-misreported subject of teacher tenure and the conservative crusade to turn all state public school teachers into, effectively, temps.

“Last Friday’s Observer reported the misgivings of superintendents and school boards over the end of teacher tenure, and the challenge in determining who will be the 25 percent of teachers to be offered four-year contracts with $500/year pay raises. Sunday’s editorial also discussed these issues. But the Observer disserves this important discussion by continually repeating two Republican myths about these coming changes.

The first fable is that tenure must end because only 17 tenured teachers were fired in the 2011-12 school year. That number, from a line in the annual Department of Public Instruction report on teacher turnover, ignores the full DPI report and the story it tells.

The central fact: 11,791 teachers left their jobs that year, including 5,599 with tenure. Some tenured teachers left voluntarily, but DPI’s report shows that many were forced out. At several stages in the dismissal process, a tenured teacher can resign. The 17 “dismissed” teachers either went through the statutory hearing process to the bitter end, or never requested a hearing and were dismissed summarily. DPI’s 2012 data show that most teachers put in the dismissal crucible resign. 147 tenured teachers “resigned in lieu of termination” in 2012. And that figure also only tells part of the story.

Teachers facing dismissal will negotiate how to classify their resignation. 101 teachers resigned last year due to ‘job dissatisfaction,’ and 172 left due to a ‘reduction in force.’ Both are common, face-saving classifications for those forced to quit. Others just leave. 1,018 teachers resigned in 2012 for ‘unknown reasons” and another 339 were listed as ‘reason not given.’ Republicans ignore this reality and repeat the refrain that ‘only 17 teachers were fired.’ It fuels the agenda.

Which is a more critical policy issue: firing more teachers, or replacing the 12,000 who left last year, nearly half of them tenured and experienced?

The Republicans’ incentive to keep teachers suggests they either failed grade school math or mastered Machiavelli. They claim repeatedly that 25 percent of teachers will get a $5,000 pay-raise to waive tenure for a four-year contract. Those teachers will get $500 annual raises for four years. They will make $2000 more in the fourth year than they did in the first. Only a Scrooge would tell an employee feeding a family that this result is “really” a $5000 raise. Stop repeating this drivel uncritically.

You can read the rest of the letter by clicking here.

4 Comments


  1. NitWitCharmer

    October 25, 2013 at 9:41 am

    From the post:

    The central fact: 11,791 teachers left their jobs that year, including 5,599 with tenure. Some tenured teachers left voluntarily, but DPI’s report shows that many were forced out. At several stages in the dismissal process, a tenured teacher can resign. The 17 “dismissed” teachers either went through the statutory hearing process to the bitter end, or never requested a hearing and were dismissed summarily.

    So the argument here is that tenure does not really result in tenure because the tenured can be “forced out”, therefore NC should keep tenure?

    Help me understand…

  2. Leslie Cook

    October 25, 2013 at 11:43 am

    Tenure for teachers ensures due process. Teachers with tenure do not have a job for life; they have the right to legal process if they are unjustly accused or fired.

  3. wncgirl

    October 25, 2013 at 1:33 pm

    Gee I am sure we can just model our public school system after McCrorys staff arrangement… Only I am pretty sure the Pope’s boy will not be willing to give teachers 37% raises with no experience on their first day… like the lil Spauldings at DHHS

  4. NitWitCharmer

    October 25, 2013 at 3:17 pm

    Leslie Cook said:

    Tenure for teachers ensures due process. Teachers with tenure do not have a job for life; they have the right to legal process if they are unjustly accused or fired.

    If tenure ensures “due process” then why is it a perk?

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