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You should be paying attention to the fast food worker movement in NC

There is something inspiring happening in North Carolina right now.

It started back in August when fast food workers across North Carolina participated in a national strike by walking off their jobs to demand a living wage.   Since then, hundreds of North Carolinian workers have spoken up about the need for living wages and the right to organize.  These workers are speaking out and sharing their stories about the daily struggles of surviving on low pay that make it hard to pay rent or buy clothing for their children. 

This week, there is an opportunity to learn more about the campaign and hear from some of the workers who are demanding better treatment. 

Come to a Nov. 6 public forum with the Carolina Organizing Committee at the North Carolina Justice Center. The event starts at 6:30 p.m. and is open to the public.  

You can also learn more about the campaign, and the lives of fast food workers, by watching this video:

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Wednesday’s forum will delve into two reports released in October by the National Employment Law Project and University of California Berkeley that found taxpayers spend an estimated $3.8 billion every year to make up for the low wages and lack of benefits the 10 largest fast-food companies in the United States pay their employees.

Just how low is the pay? UC Berkeley found that most jobs in the fast food industry “pay so little that 52 percent of fast-food workers are forced to enroll their families in public assistance programs.

That reality didn’t escape the McDonald’s human resources help line, when an HR specialist recommended in this video that a Chicago-area McDonald’s employee sign up for food stamps because her salary wasn’t enough to pay for her and her children to eat.

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4 Comments

  1. Jim Wiseman

    November 5, 2013 at 10:28 am

    The so-called “living wage” is used by the left to keep its constituency beaten down by inching up the wage employers are forced to pay. Then the wage earner has no incentive to do any better.

  2. Jeremy S

    November 5, 2013 at 11:01 am

    Spoken like a person who has no clue what he’s talking about, Jim.

  3. J.C.

    November 5, 2013 at 3:26 pm

    If a person is working 40 hours a week with no benefits, it is unconscionable that this person cannot earn enough to live on in the U.S. McDonald’s and many other fast food restaurants are earning enormous profits on the backs of hard-working people who have few options for employment. If 52% of fast food workers find it necessary to enroll their families in public assistance programs, doesn’t it make sense to raise the minimum wage to an actual “living wage” so that taxpayers are not paying for this assistance?

  4. LayintheSmakDown

    November 5, 2013 at 9:02 pm

    They need to face the facts as the average FF worker who relies fully on this job (other than the teenager who part times it) would be the person you saw at the back of your class not paying attention, maybe spending more time talking about who they were going to have relations with, who they were going to do a drive by one, or what video game they were going to play instead of doing homework. Not taking advantage of the government education has consequences.

    Plus, when you raise the minimum wage, all you get is an overall inflation rate that eats it up. The businesses have to make up for the revenue and thus the minimum wage worker winds up in the same place as before. It is just basic economics.