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New Hanover teachers can’t wear “Red for Ed” shirts

A Wilmington television station is reporting that teachers in the New Hanover school district can’t wear “Red for Ed” t-shirts because the district deemed the shirts are part of a political activity. Plain red shirts are permissible.

From WWAY’s story:

The school board based its decision on an existing district policy, which outlines political activities on school property. The board says it considers “Red for Ed” a political cause.

In an e-mail to teachers and staff this morning, a principal at one local school wrote, “Based on the interpretation of the policy, staff members are not allowed to wear Red for Ed t-shirts during school hours nor are you allowed to meet and demonstrate on campus to show support for this movement because it is viewed as a political cause. If you are wearing a Red for Ed t-shirt today, it needs to be turned inside out or covered completely while in front of students. Wearing red shirts with no statements are permitted.”

Teachers started wearing the “Red for Ed” shirts in the summer to protest against the state budget. It did not include raises for North Carolina’s teachers, which are among the lowest paid in the country.

2 Comments


  1. Sandi Campbell

    November 14, 2013 at 7:41 am

    I’m surprised the Berger regime doesn’t require them to wear hair shirts.

  2. Susan Browder

    November 18, 2013 at 3:25 pm

    Yes, it would really be a shame for students to suspect that their teachers have opinions regarding the education budget or how professional educators and their students are treated. Everyone knows that teachers are expected to just suck it up and shut up.

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