NC Budget and Tax Center

New poll shows bi-partisan opposition to tax cuts and strong support for funding public schools and an educated workforce

A majority of North Carolinians oppose tax cuts that put at risk the state’s investment in public education, a recent Public Policy Polling (PPP) survey shows. When presented with cutting funding for public schools in order to provide taxpayers a tax cut, 68% of North Carolinians oppose such a move.

The tax plan signed by Governor McCrory earlier this year reduced available revenue by $525 million over the next two years and revenue in future years is reduced even further. Benefits from tax cuts in the tax plan will largely flow to the wealthy and profitable corporations, which represent less than 10 percent of all businesses in North Carolina. Under the tax plan, the wealthiest taxpayers will see their taxes cut on average by more than $9,000, with top 1 percent of income earners getting 65 percent of the total net tax cut.

Opposition to cutting investments in public education to provide such tax cuts extends across ideology and political affiliation. Among poll respondents who considered themselves “somewhat liberal”, 84% oppose such tax cuts and 56% of respondents who considered themselves “somewhat conservative” oppose such tax cuts. Furthermore, a majority of respondents who identified as Republicans (58%), Democrats (77%), and Independents (63%) oppose such tax cuts, survey results show.

A strong majority of survey respondents also value an educated and skilled workforce. When asked whether low corporate taxes or an educated and well-trained workforce is a more important way to attract businesses to the state, 62% of respondents favored the latter. This preference was consistent across political affiliation, with a majority of Democrats (69%), Republicans (52%), and Independents/Other (59%) favoring an “educated and well-trained workforce” over “low corporate income tax rates”.

The survey results highlight an important fact – when presented with the real trade-offs, the majority of North Carolinians favor investing in public education and building a quality workforce rather than tax cuts. This preference is indeed the best way to promote economic opportunity for all North Carolinians.

4 Comments

  1. Jim Wiseman

    November 21, 2013 at 1:36 pm

    There’s nothing keeping anyone from donating their money to government schools apart from taxation. To support more taxes is to support legalized theft of other people’s money. I’m the best judge of what to spend my money on.

  2. Alan

    November 21, 2013 at 5:50 pm

    Jim,

    If schools relied on funding via donation, then they wouldn’t be “government schools”, otherwise known as public education. Government, in all it’s forms, needs tax revenue to operate, you don’t need a PhD in economics to figure that out. So, what about the funding of the military, do you not support that even though it’s a government entity? What if I don’t want my taxpayer dollars going to the military industrial complex, can I withhold my taxes, on the basis it’s legalized theft?

    I don’t think we get to pick and choose where our tax revenue goes, we may only influence it by whom we vote for.

  3. Mark

    November 22, 2013 at 7:42 am

    I know that this isn’t a tax information website, but can anyone decipher this phrase on the new NC-4 form? Does this mean I can’t put “Single” on my marital status and file jointly? Thanks!

    CAUTION: If you furnish an employer with an Employee’s Withholding Allowance Certificate that contains information which has no
    reasonable basis and results in a lesser amount of tax being withheld than would have been withheld had you furnished reasonable
    information, you are subject to a penalty of 50% of the amount not properly withheld.

  4. GOP Rules

    November 22, 2013 at 11:07 am

    One more poll you cannot believe by the biased PPP. Maybe choose a non partisan source on occasion. It seems the pulse is the only one keeping these guys in business…..hmmmmm….would you guys be related?