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Talk of tuition freezes at UNC schools, while one campus increases slots for non-NC students

The board of governors for the 17-campus University of North Carolina system will decide next month if it wants to freeze in-state tuition and reject some of the tuition increases the legislature mandated for out-of-state students in this year’s budget.

Click here for a detailed overview in the News & Observer of the tuition proposal.

The UNC Board of Governors, who discussed the proposals at a meeting Thursday, will also vote on system-wide2014-15 budget recommendations (click here to see) at their meeting next month, on Feb. 21. The proposal also seeks to reverse an estimated $7.8 million in discretionary cuts called for by the legislature.

Tom Ross, the UNC system president, spoke with reporters after Friday morning’s meeting, said  continual cuts to the university system isn’t sustainable.

“What’s the breaking point when it begins to affect quality?,” Ross asked. “There are times now that we’re hearing from students that they can’t get the course they need. We have to be sure we’re protecting quality as well.”  

The board also approved a measure Friday to get rid of four bachelor’s degrees (studio arts, marine environmental science, physics and geology) at Elizabeth City State University. WRAL has some good background on the issue here.

A pilot program at N.C. Agriculture and Technical State University was approved that will raise the number of slots set aside for out-of-state freshman students. North Carolina’s public universities currently cap out-of-state enrollment at 18 percent, but the pilot program at N.C. A&T will raise that to 25 percent. (Scroll down to see NC A&T enrollment proposal)

Some board members expressed concern that the increase could be replicated at other campuses, and put North Carolina students at a disadvantage in getting into the state’s flagship schools, UNC at Chapel Hill and N.C. State University.

“Let’s take care of North Carolina students first and then let’s worry about out-of-state students,” said Henry Hinton, a Greenville broadcaster who serves on the board of governors.

Other board members pointed out that pulling in more out-of-state students could bring in talented students and boost attendance at some of the campuses with less competitive enrollment processes.

 

A&T by NC Policy Watch

 

 

One Comment


  1. Skeptic

    January 11, 2014 at 1:43 pm

    More out-state-students is not the solution. It’d just give the legislature more excuses to cut funding, citing that they’re de facto private schools already. The stuff about “talented” students is BS. That’s just board members’ egos talking.

    FWIW, Ross’s got to stop crying crocodile tears about “quality.” He’s the one defending BS athletics classes…Bottom line: No public officials gives a damn about ordinary people. it’s all about themselves and the rich people who fund them, i.e., boosters.

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