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Time is now for action on coal ash

coal_ash-1An editorial in this morning’s Charlotte Observer rightfully calls for action from Duke Energy to make sure that there are no more disasters like the one impacting the Dan River:

“At Dan River, the unexpected was not only a break in a half-century old pipe that runs beneath the pond, but a discovery that sections of the pipe were made of corrugated metal, not the heavier reinforced concrete that Duke thought. At Riverbend, which has no such pipe, the unexpected could be catastrophic weather or the rupture of a containment berm, which is what happened in 2010 to a coal ash basin near Duke’s Sutton Steam plant near Wilmington.”

What can Duke do? Clean the unlined ponds. Recycle the coal ash or move it to dry, lined landfills. That’s what two South Carolina utilities have agreed to do in settling a lawsuit with the Southern Environmental Law Center, Catawba Riverkeeper and other groups. Yes, moving the coal ash is more expensive than leaving it where it is, but it’s nowhere near the legal and financial cost of a coal ash failure that contaminates a water supply.

The paper might’ve added that Duke, a company that is the biggest utility in the country, makes billions each year in profits and supposedly exists to serve the public interest, should also move as expeditiously as possible to end its use of coal. Period. That would, of course, be the best way to solve the coal ash problem.

Read the entire editorial by clicking here.

Read more here: http://www.charlotteobserver.com/2014/02/05/4666116/getting-ahead-of-the-next-coal.html#.UvN4JrQjpn9#storylink=cpy

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