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Buncombe County passes resolution rejecting teacher contracts

Last night, Buncombe County joined a growing list of school districts that have passed resolutions rejecting the state’s new teacher contract system, which awards 4-year contracts to the top 25% of teachers (how those teachers are chosen is unclear) in exchange for relinquishing their tenure rights early.

From the Citizen-Times:

“The Board believes that retroactively removing career status from those teachers who have already obtained it may unconstitutionally interfere with employment contracts legally issued by the Board,” the resolution states.

The resolution also claims that the language in the 25 percent mandate is “vague and subject to multiple, inconsistent interpretations.

“The 25 percent mandate fails as a ‘merit-based’ pay initiative in that teachers had no prior notice of the criteria necessary to earn additional compensation.”

“I’m glad we’re taking this bold first step,” board member Lisa Baldwin said. “I want to challenge the board to go further.”

Buncombe County joins 15 other school districts in rejecting the merits of the 25% teacher contracts. Guilford and Durham counties have gone a step further, filing a lawsuit challenging the new teacher contract system and the dissolution of teacher tenure, also known as career status.

A full list of the local school districts that have passed resolutions rejecting the teacher contracts, with links to their resolutions, can be found on NCAE’s website here.

2 Comments


  1. Bill

    March 7, 2014 at 12:08 pm

    Senator Nesbitt would be proud of the Buncombe County School Board taking this action.

  2. Bill

    March 7, 2014 at 2:21 pm

    There is a pretty clear message when so many school boards are opposed to this proposal to award only 25% of their teachers with such a small amount of money. And teachers are opposed, not because of the pitiful amount of money, or the loss of reasonable due process – but because it is simply unfair. Would teachers tell their students that no matter what their achievements that only 25% could get A’s or pass? How ridiculous is that?

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