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Rejecting and embracing Common Core – all at the same time

Earlier this week Indiana’s governor signed a law opting out of the Common Core State Standards. As NC Policy Watch’s Lindsay Wagner noted, Indiana – one of the very first state’s to adopt the standards – had just become the first to pull out.

Today ThinkProgress reports that the committee appointed to draft new standards for Indiana is close to embracing some of the very same guidelines they earlier rejected:

‘A ThinkProgress comparison of the education guidelines reveals numerous instances where the draft Indiana standards are copied word-for-word from the Common Core.

For instance, both sets of 12th grade standards seek to “Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-on-one, in groups and teacher-led) with diverse partners on grades 11-12 topics” and “Evaluate a speaker’s point of view, reasoning, and use of evidence and rhetoric.” Numerous similarities exist at other grade levels as well:
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State education officials admit that the Indiana guidelines are modeled on “several sets of previous expectations, including the Common Core,” potentially undermining opponents’ claim that the standards themselves are inappropriate. Instead, the drafting process seems to imply that concerns about the federal guidelines are more political in nature.’

For an in-depth look at how the Common Core is being received in North Carolina, be sure to read Wagner’s piece: Dissatisfaction with Common Core State Standards crosses political lines.

The committee charged with reviewing the CCSS in our state will make their final recommendations to North Carolina’s General Assembly by April 25th.

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