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New Report: Black, Latino, American-Indian children face greater barriers to achieving success

A new report by the Annie E. Casey Foundation explores the intersection of race and opportunity and finds that in North Carolina, children who are white or Asian are in a better positioned for success than black, Latino and American Indian children.

The report examines 12 indicators — such as high school graduation rates, teenage birthrates, employment prospects, and family income — to determine a child’s success from birth to adulthood.

In North Carolina, using a single composite score placed on a scale of one (lowest) to 1,000 (highest), Asian and Pacific Islander children have the highest index score at 746 followed by white children at 687. Scores for Latino (347), American-Indian (364) and African-American (346) children are distressingly lower.

“North Carolina’s future prosperity depends on our ability to ensure that all children can achieve their full potential,” said Rob Thompson, director of communications for NC Child. “By 2018, children of color will represent the majority of children in the United States, and as our state’s demographics follow suit, it’s more important than ever to create equitable opportunities for children of color.”

Thompson notes that public policies that promote access to high-quality early learning opportunities and alleviate financial hardship for working families can improve opportunities for children of color.

He also points to the expiration of the state Earned Income Tax Credit (EITC) and cuts early childhood programs like Smart Start and child care subsidies as policy decisions that will increase the barriers for many children of color in North Carolina.

To see how North Carolina fared on the 12 indicators used in this report compared to the rest of the country, click on the graphic below:

 

Annie E cASY MAP

 

One Comment


  1. Greg Richardson

    April 1, 2014 at 4:04 pm

    Report to NC Commission of Indian Affairs, NC Tribes and Organizations
    A report released today by the Annie E. Casey Foundation explores the intersection of race and opportunity and finds that in North Carolina, children who are white or Asian are in a better positioned for success than black, Latino and American Indian children. The report examines 12 indicators — such as high school graduation rates, teenage birthrates, employment prospects, and family income — to determine a child’s success from birth to adulthood.
    In North Carolina, using a single composite score placed on a scale of one (lowest) to 1,000 (highest), Asian and Pacific Islander children have the highest index score at 746 followed by white children at 687. Scores for Latino (347), American-Indian (364) and African-American (346) children are distressingly lower.
    Prior to the report being released, Mr. Rob Thompson, Director of Communications with NC Child contacted me and wanted feedback regarding the report, from an American Indian standing point, prior to the release of the report. I was pleased that he and his organization reached out to the NC Commission of Indian Affairs, prior to the release of the report, however, I advised him that it would have been nice to have had input prior to the report being released.He was quite apologetic and agreed to include the commission when the 2016 Report is developed. Additionally, I questioned several sources of data in the report which references American Indian Children in the following context:
    • American Indian Children have the widest variation in the index of any group.
    • Tend to do better in Texas Alabama, Florida, Kansas, New York and California (No reference to North Carolina’s Indian Children).
    • Tend to meet few mile stones in the upper Midwest, Southwest and the Mountain states (State’s with high concentration of federally recognized Indian children – No reference to American Indian children in North Carolina, where there is ha high concentration of state recognized or off reservation Indian children.
    • In South Dakota has the lowest level of well-being of any group of children in any state according to the R4R index (185/1000).

    The report can be viewed by going to the following webpage address:

    http://pulse.ncpolicywatch.org/2014/04/01/new-report-black-latino-children-face-barriers-to-achieving-success/

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