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Sharply divided Supreme Court strikes down 2-year aggregate on campaign contributions

Holding true to their inclinations revealed at oral argument and splitting along party lines in a 5-4 decision, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled today in McCutcheon v. Federal Election Commission that 2-year aggregate limits on campaign contributions are invalid under the First Amendment.

Chief Justice John Roberts wrote the opinion, joined by Justices Antonin Scalia,Samuel Alito and Anthony Kennedy. Justice Clarence Thomas wrote an opinion concurring in the result, and Justices Ruth Bader Ginsburg, Stephen Breyer, Sonia Sotomayor and Elena Kagan dissented.

At issue in McCutcheon was the federal law that caps the total amount of campaign contributions an individual can give to all federal candidates over a two-year period at $48,600. It also limits the total amount an individual can give to political committees that make contributions to candidates to $74,600 and caps the total amount for contributions in the two-year cycle at to $74,600.

Read the full opinion here.

3 Comments


  1. Sean D Sorrentino

    April 2, 2014 at 2:16 pm

    That should be a big help to Mike Bloomberg, George Soros, and the like.

  2. Alan

    April 2, 2014 at 2:50 pm

    You left out “Big Union Bosses”.

  3. Sean D Sorrentino

    April 3, 2014 at 7:41 am

    I thought that “Big Union Bosses” was stating the obvious, but I take your point.

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