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New “Executive Paywatch” report highlights soaring wage gap between CEO’s and average NC workers

(Image: AFL-CIO / paywatch.org)

Just when you thought things couldn’t get much worse on the American inequality front, you encounter reports like the new “Executive Paywatch” report from the AFL-CIO.

Click here to check out the website — it includes a section in which you can view CEO pay by state. And while the top guys (and they’re almost all guys – 67 out of 69) in North Carolina aren’t as obscenely wealthy as they are in New York or Texas, the gap remains huge; the ratio of CEO pay to that of the average worker in North Carolina is 108 to 1.

 

 

 

7 Comments


  1. Alex

    April 16, 2014 at 12:43 pm

    Just imagine what the pay gap is between athletes and entertainers and average NC workers. Funny that we never see any discussion with those two groups.

  2. Rob Schofield

    April 16, 2014 at 12:47 pm

    Please feel free to post or forward them — they deserve to be highlighted as well.

  3. Alan

    April 16, 2014 at 3:40 pm

  4. Alex

    April 16, 2014 at 4:44 pm

    You’ve already settled that argument many times before Alan !

  5. Alan

    April 16, 2014 at 6:09 pm

    Perhaps you missed the point?

  6. ML

    April 17, 2014 at 12:47 pm

    The athlete and entertainers can’t be compared to the average worker. They are not ceo’s, they would have to be included in with the average worker. Cam newton is and employee of the nfl not an owner/CEO. The comparison isn’t just between rich and poor, there must be a relation between the CEO and the workers for the comparison to work.

    While grouping athletes with workers may decrease the gap, it shows an important aspect of why the athletes and entertainers are an exception to CEO/average worker debate, they all have strong unions. But to be clear trying to throw athletes and entainers in this debate is simply apples and oranges.

  7. ML

    April 17, 2014 at 12:48 pm

    The athlete and entertainers can’t be compared to the average worker. They are not ceo’s, they would have to be included in with the average worker. Cam newton is and employee of the nfl not an owner/CEO. The comparison isn’t just between rich and poor, there must be a relation between the CEO and the workers for the comparison to work.

    While grouping athletes with workers may decrease the gap, it shows an important aspect of why the athletes and entertainers are an exception to CEO/average worker debate, they all have strong unions. But to be clear trying to throw athletes and entainers in this debate is simply apples and oranges.

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