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McCrory wants high academic standards, doesn’t care about Common Core “brand”

Common Core picGov. Pat McCrory told reporters yesterday that he favors high academic standards, but doesn’t care about the Common Core brand.

“What we’ve got to talk about is high standards, especially in math and reading,” said McCrory following an event that awarded federal bonus dollars to teachers who develop new classroom materials for a statewide database.”If you ask most North Carolinians if they want high math and reading standards, they’re gonna be for it. I don’t care what you call it…I could care less about the brand name.”

The Common Core “brand,” as McCrory calls it, was adopted by North Carolina in 2010. Approximately 45 states and the District of Columbia have also adopted the academic standards, which are billed as a set of guidelines for what students should be able to know and do in math and English language arts. The state has spent upwards of $100 million of both federal and state dollars as well as countless teacher training hours on the implementation of the Common Core.

Lawmakers have used the short legislative session this spring to move toward repealing the Common Core, which some have assailed for being inappropriately difficult in some grade levels and poorly implemented. Nearly identical bills aimed at putting a stop to the implementation of the standards and creating a review commission to recommend alternatives have passed both the House and Senate, and their differences are currently being worked out in a conference committee.

When speaking to a group of Common Core supporters last month, however, McCrory said that the move to opt out of Common Core, which a number of other states is also considering, was not a smart move. He has also said he is working with lawmakers to come up with a compromise that would preserve high academic standards for the state.

“I hope that we’re going to come to some common ground on the Common Core,” said McCrory yesterday. “I think that the brand of Common Core has been damaged by anything that goes wrong with education.”

If legislation passes that would reneg on the state’s promise to implement the Common Core, McCrory declined to say whether he’d veto the bill.

 

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