Uncategorized

Court budget cuts still hanging in the balance

With the budget focus still on education cuts and new Medicaid proposals, it’s easy to forget that plenty of other issues remain unresolved in the General Assembly.

Here’s a quick recap of proposed budget provisions affecting the courts and justice system.

Funding for the Administrative Office of the Court  Both the Senate and the House take an ax to system-wide funding of the courts. The Senate cuts technology funding to the courts by $3.7 million and the remaining AOC administrative appropriation by an additional $1.5 million. AOC fares only slightly better in the House budget, which directs cuts of $4.95 million without specifying where.

Cuts to Family Courts  The initial House budget guts Family Courts, eliminating $3 million in funding and 36 positions, a proposal in neither the Senate nor Governor’s budget. The bodies are still in disagreement over that proposal, though the House has since reduced the cuts to just Family Court administrators, eliminating $962,910 and 11 positions.

Legal Aid  TheSenate proposed cutting the court fees passed through the state bar to Legal Services to the tune of $1.8 million. The text providing for these cuts does not appear in the most recent compromise draft of the budget (as of June 13). Both bodies eliminate a $670,000 Access to Civil Justice grant to Legal Aid.

Public Defender  Both the House and Senate cut funds for indigent defense administrative costs, the House by $466,380, the Senate by $233,190 (including the elimination of the Public Defender Administrator).

State Bureau of Investigation/Crime Lab  Both bodies agree on transferring the SBI to Public Safety, but the Senate also wants to transfer the Crime Lab to DPS.

Three judge courts  The Senate also proposed substantive changes to the handling of constitutional challenges to state laws, requiring that all such cases be heard in Wake County by a panel of three judges selected from different parts of the state by the Chief Justice (similar to the process with redistricting challenges).

The Senate would also require that trial court orders temporarily blocking enforcement of a state law challenged as unconstitutional be automatically stayed (meaning that the challenged law remains enforceable while appeals are pursued).  And any such order would be directly appealable to the state Supreme Court – bypassing the Court of Appeals.

The text of these proposals does not appear in the most recent compromise draft of the budget (as of June 13).

For more on the initial Senate budget, read here.

For a further comparison of the Senate and House budgets, read here.

Check Also

State Supreme Court rules retroactive application of teacher tenure repeal is unconstitutional

The state Supreme Court ruled unanimously today that ...

Top Stories from NCPW

  • News
  • Commentary

With just a few hours left until the crossover deadline, the state of North Carolina’s environment i [...]

On Monday morning, there was only one way left to save the Court of Appeals and a few hours with whi [...]

The political compromise that repealed HB2 was enough for the NCAA and ACC, both of which have retur [...]

Conference comes a day after new report lauds benefits of same-day registration The new line-up for [...]

How many times do we have to say it? Well, it’s worth repeating – especially in the aftermath of rec [...]

As the national pundits weigh in on President Trump’s first 100 days in office and the General Assem [...]

How the General Assembly is spending “crossover week” and what it ought to be doing The last week of [...]

To casual observers, the recent controversy surrounding public school class-size mandates in grades [...]

Featured | Special Projects

Trump + North Carolina
In dozens of vitally important areas, policy decisions of the Trump administration are dramatically affecting and altering the lives of North Carolinians. This growing collection of stories summarizes and critiques many of the most important decisions and their impacts.
Read more


HB2 - The continuing controversy
Policy Watch’s comprehensive coverage of North Carolina’s sweeping anti-LGBT law.
Read more