New Report: 26% of North Carolina’s children live in poverty

A new report by the Annie E. Casey Foundation provides a sobering look at how children are faring in North Carolina.

The 2014 KIDS COUNT Data Book, which looks at 16 separate factors, ranks our state 38th in overall economic well-being, 28th in education, and 32nd in health.

KIDS-COUNTpoverty-graphic1

Source: KIDS COUNT Data book http://www.aecf.org

The annual report concludes:

‘Although unemployment is slowly declining, job growth has been concentrated in low-wage sectors and in nonstandard employment that tends to be less stable and offer few or no benefits, such as health insurance and paid sick leave.

A stronger labor market and an increase in job quality, along with continued efforts to boost the education and training levels of low-income parents, would help to further reduce child poverty.’

In North Carolina, 26% of children lived in poverty in 2012, according to the new report.

Locally, the Inter-Faith Food Shuttle is working to help address this problem by creating long-term solutions to hunger for North Carolina’s low-income families.  To learn more about this week’s special HungerFreeNC community movement, click here.

Hear more about food insecurity from the Food Shuttle’s executive director Jill Bullard on News and Views with Chris Fitzsimon.

Also be sure to watch Thursday’s documentary “Hungry for Answers” at 7:00 p.m. on WRAL-TV.

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