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Ten Reasons why Educators dislike the state budget

Even as House and Senate leaders tout a seven percent pay raise for teachers, the North Carolina Association of Educators is out with a top ten list of why the final 2014-15 budget lawmakers will vote this week on is bad for education. The NCAE notes the budget compromise takes away longevity pay, funds vouchers, and covers other needed resources with one time, non-recurring funds:

Here’s the NCAE’s complete list:

Top 10 Reasons the 2014-15 Budget is Bad

  1.     The budget is built on an ill-conceived tax cut plan for the wealthy and for-profit corporations and is unsustainable.ncae
  2.     The budget is an unfulfilled promise for public education and only a small down payment on the State’s IOU to students, public education and educators.
  3.     The budget continues to disrespect educators who want to earn a master’s or other degree.
  4.     The budget does not provide a 7 percent raise, as it takes away longevity and folds it into the salary steps for teachers.
  5.     The budget is not a comprehensive plan and is not committed to moving NC teacher salaries to the national average.
  6.     The budget creates inequity for public school state employees and non-public school state employees by providing different raises.
  7.     The budget expands the use of taxpayer dollars for vouchers without accountability.
  8.     The budget appears to shift needed resources to non-recurring allocations and unstable funding sources.
  9.     The budget will place an extra burden on locals as they have to decide what to fund, what to cut and what to maintain for quality public education.
  10.     The budget has many details that have not been shared for discussion in a transparent setting or opportunity for input.

 

4 Comments


  1. Sally Buckner

    July 31, 2014 at 1:50 pm

    Do look at the “average 7% teacher raise”. This is using the “average” to support their lie that “this is the largest teacher raise ever. Yes, beginning teachers and those early in their careers will get big raises–up to 18%. But those with 29 years experience (many with advanced degrees, many National Board Certified, many who have led their schools in performance) will get 1% -or less! That is NOT a misprint. And because the annual longevitiy raise for those after 10 years of teaching is ended, they may even lose money.

  2. Mig

    July 31, 2014 at 6:03 pm

    Also if you take a close look at the change in step structure, you will notice that the new one will only give us a raise every 4-5 years. In reality that will come to an average yearly raise of 1.4-1.75%, which is still a slap in the face when you compare it to the national average of 3%. Then consider that the cost of living continues to rise, we’ll still be spinning our wheels and getting nowhere if we stay in this profession. It’s disheartening!

  3. Curtis

    July 31, 2014 at 8:31 pm

    Well I’m glad for teachers but it looks like school psychologists, and speech pathologists get the shaft. Unless I’m reading it wrong, a starting school psychologist will make 500 less if they start this year vs. last year.

  4. MAMA MAC

    August 4, 2014 at 4:25 pm

    I’m not a teacher but my daughter is. After the axing (or “folding in) of longevity pay she will fall into the 1% or less group. Our current NC Legislature has delivered a blow that I think progress may never recover, unless we vote for statesmen/women who can see beyond filling the coffers of those who have already almost emptied the trough! Their actions (not just in education) make what once was an honorable and rewarding profession a lost dream.

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