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Social Security at 79: New report highlights benefits for North Carolinians

This week marks the 79th anniversary of Social Security, and the North Carolina Alliance for Retired Americans is marking the occasion with a new report on the economic impact of those benefits in our state.

Here are ten quick facts from that report, Social Security Works for North Carolina.

• Social Security provided benefits to 1,907,394 North Carolinians in 2013, 1 in 5 (19.4 percent) residents.

• North Carolinians received Social Security benefits totaling $26.6 billion in 2013, an amount equivalent to 7 percent of the state’s total personal income.

• The average Social Security benefit in North Carolina was $13,950 in 2013.SS-79

• Social Security lifted 810,000 North Carolinians out of poverty in 2012.

• Social Security provided benefits to 1,255,185 North Carolina retired workers in 2013, two-thirds (65.8 percent) of beneficiaries.

• The typical benefit received by a retired worker in North Carolina was $15,179 in 2013.

• Social Security lifted 559,000 North Carolinians aged 65 or older out of poverty in 2012.

• Without Social Security, the elderly poverty rate in North Carolina would have increased from 1 in 9 (10.4 percent) to half (52.6 percent) [Figure 2].

• Social Security provided disability benefits to 332,799 North Carolina workers in 2013, 1 in 6 (17.4 percent) North Carolina beneficiaries [Figure 1].

• Social Security is more important to North Carolinians living in rural or non-metropolitan counties than to North Carolinians living in metropolitan counties. One-quarter (24.2 percent) of rural North Carolinians received Social Security in 2012, compared with 1 in 6 (18.2 percent) metropolitan North Carolinians.

2 Comments


  1. Alex

    August 12, 2014 at 3:55 pm

    If you don’t have other pension benefits or investments,then Social Security is not “lifting” anyone out of poverty. An annual amount of $14,000 is at best a very meager living with today’s high prices. Consider that today we have 43 Million folks over 65, and by 2050 we will have 83 million over 65, so without major changes and with the small percentage of active workers, the program is doomed. Most people just choose to ignore the inevitable.

  2. Sandee

    August 14, 2014 at 9:47 am

    This is why it is so important to keep Democrats in office. They want to take the cap off SS and expand it. Republicans want to privatize it and give it to wall street which would put millions of seniors out in the street. Spread the word that we Democrats must get out and vote in 2014 and 2016. All seniors should be voting for their best interest instead of just voting the way they have always voted. They are not paying attention to what is going on. If you want to keep and increase SS and improve Medicare you must vote Democrat. Make sure you have a picture government issued ID for 2016. You can obtain one at the DMV.

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