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Today’s amazing inequality statistics

These come from a recent University of California Alumni Association profile of economist Emmanuel Saez and his work that was linked to by the excellent online newsletter Too Much:

The top 1 percenters in the United States, for example, have seen their share of national income rise from under 8 percent in 1970 to just under 20 percent in 2010. A similar pattern is seen in Canada, which also adopted the same esprit de laissez-faire that made Reaganomics the hallmark of United States fiscal policy in the 1980s.

In contrast, over the same period, the top 1 percenters in Japan saw their share of national income inch up from 8 to 9.5 percent. French and Swedish plutocrats were similarly deprived. (Emphasis supplied).

Meanwhile, check out the following amazing graph of Census data that also comes from the folks at Too Much:

Inequality - Shrinking nest eggs

Source: Too Much Online – A project of the Program on Inequality and the Common Good of the Washington, D.C.-based Institute for Policy Studies

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