Commentary

Editorial critical of latest DENR-Duke shenanigans

ACoal Ashs noted in this space yesterday morning, federal regulators have been forced in recent days to put the kibosh on yet another sweetheart arrangement between Duke Energy and the McCrory administration that would have allowed the company to begin to address some of the problems in its coal ash “ponds” by draining the toxic liquid directly into rivers and streams. What could go wrong, huh?

This morning the editorial page of the Fayetteville Observer rightfully (if rather politely) criticizes the plan and issues a word of thanks to federal officials at the EPA for stepping in and putting up a big stop sign:

In late August, DENR told Duke it could begin draining all of its 33 ash ponds across the state. Three weeks later, the EPA intervened, pointing out that this would likely violate Duke’s wastewater discharge permits and allow massive amounts of polluted water to be dumped, with virtually no monitoring for the impact on water quality.

Ponds at Duke’s shut-down Cape Fear power plant, which sits upstream from water-treatment plants for Lee, Harnett and Cumberland counties, hold an estimated billion gallons of coal-ash-contaminated wastewater. According to the EPA, DENR would have allowed Duke to dump it all in the river.

A Duke vice president complained that being forced to comply with its permits may make it impossible to meet a cleanup timetable.

We’re grateful that the EPA stepped in, but sorry to see DENR again being so casual about our health and safety. We hope the feds continue to watch closely.

Let’s hope the McCrory administration doesn’t give a lot of folks good reason to get a lot less polite with their criticism in the days ahead. We’re not, however, holding our breath on that front.

One Comment


  1. ncsense

    October 7, 2014 at 10:25 am

    It would be interesting to know who at DENR approved the original decision. I can’t believe the water quality professionals didn’t understand the problem with allowing Duke Energy to use the existing permit (for discharge of less contaminated water from the top of the ash ponds) to completely dewater the ponds. Apparently no additional conditions and no additional monitoring. That really is mind-boggling.

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