Commentary

Powerful report underscores success of Clean Water Act and efforts to save it from corporate polluters

060810_1509_Environment1.jpgThe good people at Environment North Carolina and their national allies released a powerful new report today that’s worth your time to check out. It’s called “Waterways Restored: The Clean Water Act’s Impact on 15 American Rivers, Lakes and Bays” and it does at least two extremely important things:

1)  It demonstrates the amazing success of a vitally important environmental protection law — the Clean Water Act, and

2) It makes the case for saving that law from the relentless attacks of corporate polluters and restoring it to its original intent of making all American waters safe for fishing and and swimming.

As the report explains, the Clean Water Act has, over the last 42 years, made enormous strides in cleaning up and preserving our nation’s waters. The report highlights 15 of these success stories, including North Carolina’s North Fork First Broad River, which has, thanks to the CWA, been been preserved as a pristine fishing venue and home to numerous endangered species. Other, more urban waterways like Cleveland’s Cuyahoga River and Boston Harbor have been brought back from the dead to become thriving and healthy sites as a result of the law.

Unfortunately and not surprisingly, major polluters continue to fight the law at every turn. Several years ago, they secured a controversial U.S. Supreme Court ruling that created some giant loopholes in the law and essentially excluded a huge number of the nation’s streams and waterways from protection. As a result, 56% of North Carolina’s rivers and streams are no longer protected by the law as they should be.

To correct this glaring gap in the law, the Army Corps of Engineers and the EPA have proposed new rules to clarify that thousands of rivers and streams now excluded will be included in the law’s protections. The new report calls on these agencies to go ahead and finalize these new rules as quickly as possible.

Click here to read the report. The discussion of the North Fork First Broad River can be found on pages 25 and 26.

Check Also

Conservative NC lawmakers boost controversial King Day gun rally

Concerns continue to grow about a gun rights ...

Top Stories from NCPW

  • News
  • Commentary

North Carolina is projected to gain a U.S. House seat in the coming years, recent data show — a chan [...]

New facilities and policies offer hope to 16 and 17 year-olds once consigned to the adult correction [...]

State Rep. Holly Grange (R-New Hanover) failed to disclose a business owned and operated by her husb [...]

By the time the new Interstate 885 opens in Durham later this year, some of the people who conceived [...]

There is a temptation—and believe me, I understand it—to celebrate the fleeting nature of this week’ [...]

The North Carolina General Assembly is back in Raleigh this week and, as noted in this space last Fr [...]

The post DTH making its mark on Silent Sam settlement appeared first on NC Policy Watch. [...]

A long road remains to be traveled before North Carolinians find out whether they’ll have to show an [...]