News

Charitable giving down in North Carolina

The N.C. Secretary of State’s office had a report out yesterday that found North Carolina residents are continuing a downward trend in their charitable giving.

The office, led by Elaine Marshall, a Democrat, monitors charities in the state and puts out a report each year about the how much of a charity’s incoming revenue goes to services and program and how much covers overhead costs.

In 2013-14, North Carolina charities received $21.4 million, a drop of 33 percent from the $32.2 million in donations that came in the year before. This year was also the lowest amount that’s been donated in the past four years.

It also comes as the effects of the recession continue to linger in North Carolina, and more families and residents are turning to charities for help.

Nearly one in every five families in the state aren’t making enough to cover their basic living expenses as the state’s manufacturing base has been replaced by low-paying jobs in the service and tourism industries, according to a  report published in June 2014 by the N.C. Justice Center’s Budget and Tax Center.

Employment levels have been on a slow climb out of the recession, and last month North Carolina finally saw its employment numbers match the number of jobs there were in the state before the recession began in 2008.

“Clearly, we are seeing that North Carolina households are still under a great deal of economic pressure,” Marshall said, in a written statement. “I thank everyone who is continuing to finds ways to support the non-profits out there that are trying to accomplish good works.”

The figures don’t cover all of charitable giving in the state – only those charities that use professional fundraising services, pay officers of the charity and raise more than $25,000. Educational institutions, churches and other religious groups and groups like volunteer fire departments also don’t have to report their information to Marshall’s office.

You can read the report here, and search to see what individual charities collected, and what went to overhead costs.

 

3 Comments


  1. Alex

    November 26, 2014 at 2:38 pm

    I wish we could have given charities half of that $125 Million wasted on the Senate race in NC. Amazing that Senator Hagan spent more on attack ads than the total that was given to charities.

  2. Alan

    November 27, 2014 at 6:11 pm

    Interesting that Alex chooses to mention only Kay Hagan. Amazing that he makes no mention of the GOP spending, and the majority of it by groups outside of NC.

  3. ron

    November 30, 2014 at 12:20 am

    I have to agree with Alan. The attacks started with the Tillis campaign and out of state special interest groups he refused to distance himself from.

Check Also

UNC Board of Governors face protest, chooses new board chair and interim president

It was a busy day at the final ...

Top Stories from NCPW

  • News
  • Commentary

On May 25, the news headlines read that Democratic state Senate candidate Jen Mangrum had been disqu [...]

If it seemed impossible that neighbors of industrialized hog farms had any legal rights left to lose [...]

Can you put a price tag on victims' rights? A fiscal note obtained by NC Policy Watch that has [...]

A new bill to relocate the “Silent Sam” Confederate monument on UNC’s flagship Chapel Hill campus ai [...]

The post SB 711 – The pig’s roast appeared first on NC Policy Watch. [...]

In another effort to pander to the minority of Americans who want to make abortion and birth control [...]

The practice of loading down noncontroversial legislation with divisive and partisan provisions is a [...]

It usually happens a few times every legislative session: at some point during their annual stay in [...]