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Junior Senator sets the record straight on controversial “religious freedom” bill (video)

Senate President Pro Tem Phil Berger made good on his promise Wednesday to file legislation that would allow magistrates to refuse to perform marriages for same sex couples. Senate Bill 2 states:

Every magistrate has the right to recuse from performing all lawful marriages under this Chapter based upon any sincerely held religious objection.

Senator Jeff Jackson, a former prosecutor, told reporters such legislation undermine marriage equality and seeks to legitimize discrimination:

“In this nation, we as citizens don’t have to pass any government employees personal religious test in order to receive government service. And that’s exactly what a magistrate does – provide a government service. In the United States we do not condition government service on the religious agreement by the government worker,” said Jackson during a press conference.

“Government offices that are open to the public, must be open to everyone on the same terms, including the people who are gay or lesbian.”

Click below to hear Sen. Jackson’s remarks:

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