Commentary

Celebrate Fred Korematsu

Today should be a national holiday.

No, not because of EITC Awareness, although the post below this one highlights that important issue as well. Because of Fred Korematsu, who was born on this day 96 years ago.

Korematsu was born in Oakland, Calif., but his U.S. citizenship didn’t keep him from being arrested for refusing to be relocated to an internment camp in 1942. He challenged his arrest in court, and two years later the case made its way to the Supreme Court. Korematsu challenged the constitutionality of Executive Order 9066, the decree that forced the relocation of people of Japanese descent to internment camps. The court ruled in favor of the government and against Korematsu in what is now widely considered one of its worst decisions. The majority of justices claimed the detentions were not based on racial discrimination but rather on suspicions that Japanese-Americans were acting as spies.

After World War II, Korematsu was released. But the conviction remained on his record for 40 years until it was finally overturned in 1983.

California was the first state to make Jan. 30 a holiday. Four states now honor Fred Korematsu on this day, and we should expand that number. He was a hero who believed in the U.S. Constitution, earned the Presidential Medal of Freedom and continued to advocate for civil rights until his death in 2005.

 

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