- The Progressive Pulse - http://pulse.ncpolicywatch.org -

Right tries to spin state jobs picture, but to no avail

If you’re an unemployed or underemployed North Carolinian trying to get by in a community that’s never recovered from the Great Recession, take heart: things are actually just ducky according to conservative think tanks — no matter what your eyes and bank account tell you.

For “confirmation” check out this morning’s Locke Foundation missive from the group’s former director: “Job Growth Sizzled Last Year.” [1] The column is just the latest in an ceaseless series of articles designed to spin the situation in North Carolina and convince people that two obvious things are not true: a) The state economy continues to struggle to generate good jobs to replace the ones lost in the Great Recession and b) the North Carolina recovery that has occurred is mostly just a reflection of national trends.

Happily, some analysts and experts aren’t just trying to cover up for the destructive and counter-productive policies of the McCrory administration and the General Assembly (which, together, have about as much to do with the limited good news that has taken place in the state as they do with the price of tea in China).

Patrick McHugh of the Budget and Tax Center, for instance, explained what’s really going on in the North Carolina economy Monday in this new report: “Growth Without Prosperity.” [2] This is from the release that accompanied the report:

“The worst of the Great Recession is behind us, but the damage lingers, weighing down communities and families across North Carolina. We are now seven years removed from the financial crisis of 2008, but in North Carolina wages are down, job creation is lagging, and many communities are still stuck in recession.

Given all of the positive headlines lately, it’s easy to get the impression that the recovery is in full swing. Last year was the best since the financial crisis, with North Carolina and the nation finally getting back to the number of jobs that existed before the recession. The unemployment rate has also been dropping since the bottom of the Great Recession in 2009. However, these positive trends do not tell the whole story, particularly in North Carolina.

There are still not enough jobs for everyone who wants to work in North Carolina, but that’s far from the only problem. Simply put, North Carolina’s economy is not working for everyone: