Commentary

Troubled homeowners lose out again in gas tax compromise

foreclosed house-for Rob(1).jpgHere’s an issue from the current state policy debate that hasn’t gotten nearly enough attention in recent days: the General Assembly’s new plan to tax homeowners who manage to get some of their debt forgiven in order to avoid foreclosure and stay in their homes. Under the new gas tax compromise brokered by the House and Senate and tentatively approved yesterday, the Senate’s original plan to tax these homeowners for the loan forgiveness — something the feds do not do — has been put back in the bill.

As the one state capital journalist who has been doing a consistently solid job of following this issue, Mark Binker of WRAL, reported last week:

“North Carolina has decided to charge taxes on some items that would have gone untaxed due to changes to federal laws. The most controversial change along these lines has to do with mortgage debt that is forgiven.

When someone who is in a financial pinch has the amount they owe on their home forgiven through a debt relief program, that can be counted as income. The federal government decided not to tax this amount, but the state will under the Senate Bill 20.

This change was controversial when the measure passed through the Senate because it levies a big tax bill on those trying to work their way out of debt. When House lawmakers first passed this bill, they excluded the mortgage forgiveness from taxes. The compromise measure takes the Senate position.”

You got that? even as people throughout the state gnash teeth and get hot under the collar about a few pennies on a gallon of gas, many North Carolinians will now quite possibly and unnecessarily lose their homes as the result of new taxes that directly defeat the purpose of public programs that were designed to save them. The move is, in short, a perfect symbol of the shortsighted and regressive approach to tax policy that is one of the signature features of the current state political leadership.

3 Comments


  1. LayintheSmakDown

    March 31, 2015 at 5:30 pm

    Such hyperbole Rob! You guys are a bit hot under your collars too. If the bank would forgive my house debt, I would gladly pay the taxes on that imputed income. The people taking advantage of this are getting a good deal regardless.

  2. LayintheSmakDown

    March 31, 2015 at 5:34 pm

    Man, I wish you had a comment editing feature on this site. Maybe you can get Esmay, Alan, or one of your other interns to program that feature.
    …….
    One more good thing for these people. Now that income taxes for all North Carolinians have been lowered, they will be paying less taxes on their gain.

  3. david esmay

    March 31, 2015 at 9:29 pm

    Funny LSD, Esmay is construction superintendent currently working on a project in Bridgeport,WV. But I will always support Policy Watches efforts to shine a light on right-wing ignorance and bad policy.

Check Also

More editorials: Nonpartisan redistricting commission a must

After watching what’s been going on in the ...

Top Stories from NCPW

  • News
  • Commentary

Future of once-powerful congressional group in question as "Trump whisperer" takes his lea [...]

Civil rights litigation isn’t always about securing a win in court – sometimes there is a deeper rec [...]

Thom Goolsby, a former North Carolina state Senator now serving on the UNC Board of Governors, is ru [...]

Duke Energy calls its new net-zero carbon emissions plan a "directional beacon," but for c [...]

It’s September and America’s school children are back in class. They’re greeted every day with the u [...]

Powerful new research confirms numerous benefits of substantially increasing public investments For [...]

The confluence of three essentially unprecedented events combined to make last week an extraordinary [...]

The post The two faces of the NC GOP appeared first on NC Policy Watch. [...]