News

House budget for courts: How it compares

Courts in crisisThe House released its proposed 2015-2017 budget this morning with some good news for the courts: an infusion of more than $18 million to finally bring the state judicial system into the digital age.

That’s way more than the $5 million former Administrative Office of the Courts director John Smith requested for technology for in his February letter to state budget director Lee Roberts.

The governor had no funding for technology in his proposed budget.

The court system would also get a much-needed boost in its operating budget — technology aside — with $15.6 million allotted over two years to cover things such as interpreters, expert witnesses, juries and other “constitutionally and legally mandated legal services as necessary to operate the State court system.”

Here’s what AOC chief legal counsel Tom Murry says the latter category includes:

Murry

That amount aligns closely with what Judge Smith and the governor had requested ($15.9 million and $16 million respectively).

One glaring omission from both the House and the governor’s budget?  Funding to bring court system staffing up to workload needs — 536 new positions, according the AOC request.

Here’s a snapshot of the House proposal:

House judicial budget

###

Check Also

State Supreme Court rules retroactive application of teacher tenure repeal is unconstitutional

The state Supreme Court ruled unanimously today that ...

Top Stories from NCPW

  • News
  • Commentary

Critics say hikes could have 'devastating impact,' serve as 'another form of voter su [...]

While COVID-19 has cancelled a lot of things this year, it hasn’t cancelled the 2020 Census. The pro [...]

Last year, after four consecutive years of poor academic performance, state lawmakers rewarded North [...]

Chancellor's failure to share health department reopening recommendations called a "breach [...]

History reminds us that it is a familiar pattern with autocrats and delusional politicians who perce [...]

The post Stamping out a fair election appeared first on NC Policy Watch. [...]

I am a white woman, educated in Durham, by mostly white teachers. From preschool to high school, my [...]

In 1986, I was a recent seminary graduate and working with Oakland’s interfaith community. I was ear [...]