Commentary

McCrory to veto magistrates bill; math on override vote could be complicated

Good for Gov. Pat McCrory. He announced this afternoon that he would veto the bill passed by the House today that would allow magistrates to opt out of their duty to officiate at marriages due to their “religious beliefs.”

Now, the question is: Can he make a veto stick or will he just get rolled over by state lawmakers as he usually does? A first look at the veto override math leads to the conclusion that he will have his work cut out for him.

The Senate seems likely to be a lost cause since only 30 votes are necessary to override and the bill passed with 32. There were also two excused absences — at least one of whom is a sure thing to support an override.

The House is where the drama will be. Assuming all members are present, 72 votes are necessary for an override. Since the bill passed by votes of 65-45 and 67-43, there would appear to be some hope. Note however, that there were 10 people who failed to participate in both votes. Add to this that at least two members voted for the measure on third reading who did not do so on second reading (Democrat Charles Graham went from “not voting” to “yes” and Republican David Lewis went from “no” to “yes”) and you can see how this could quickly get very messy.

The bottom line: Stay tuned as we’re about to find out a lot about McCrory and the future of North Carolina.

One Comment


  1. Jan

    May 29, 2015 at 9:18 am

    Gov. McCrory is not holding up his end of the bargain. They need to override his veto. We bow down to all of the minorities that complain about every little thing that “infringes” on their beliefs but yet when these magistrates want to opt out of something that is against their religious beliefs, oh hell no, we tell them “it’s your job!” You want to treat everybody the same, well then these people have the right to say it is against their religious beliefs to marry gays and they should not be forced to do so.

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