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DPI budget chief: school districts in a bind on whether to keep or let go of teacher assistants

The Department of Public Instruction’s budget chief told members of the State Board of Education Thursday that the number one issue local superintendents are wrestling with as they figure out how to fund their schools for the upcoming year is how to handle their teacher assistants.

“It is a very big problem for school districts to make a decision on how to start the school year,” said DPI’s Chief of Financial Operations Philip Price, who explained that any reductions to teacher assistants that result from final budget negotiations completed by the House and Senate in the coming weeks will be retroactive to July 1 and will leave school districts in a very tricky situation.

Budget writers in the Senate have signaled their intention to cut funding for teacher assistants significantly, eliminating more than 8,500 TA jobs over the next two year biennial budget period. The House, on the other hand, wishes to keep funding in place for TAs, setting up a for a fight that may end up being very similar to the one that took place last year.

Teacher assistants have been a target for budget writers for several years now. More than 7,000 teacher assistant jobs have been cut by lawmakers since 2009.

The General Assembly appears to be on track to head into the fall with its budget negotiations, leaving local school districts without a clear plan for how to fund classrooms and hire — or fire — teacher assistants and other classroom personnel.

The dollar difference between the House and Senate’s plans for funding TAs amounts to $195.6 million, Price told State Board of Ed members Thursday.

“Local school districts like Wake County have already started school in their year round tracks and so they’ve had to make some decisions related to how to address the teacher assistants,” said Price.

Winston-Salem/Forsyth schools have already laid off 30 TAs and warn that more might be coming.

“We still have our fingers crossed that the compromise (budget) will not cut deeper than 110 positions,” Crutchfield said of the 500 TAs that Winston Salem/Forsyth schools employes. Crutchfield, the district’s budget director, said the district would have to lay people off after they were already planning to report to work in August, according to the Winston Salem Journal.

The overall difference in the House and Senate’s budget plan for public schools, said Price, amounts to $342.6 million.

“That’s a major difference in money,” said Price. “[The General Assembly] has a pretty challenging job to do.”

In addition to TAs, Price noted the House and Senate’s other disagreements, which include how to handle driver’s education (the House restores funding, the Senate does not and eliminates the requirement for it in order to get a driver’s license), teacher salaries (House gives 4 percent raises across the board while the Senate focuses pay bumps on early career teachers) and whether or not to reduce classroom sizes by including more money to hire additional teachers (a Senate proposal).

“It’s going to be a rather lengthy, I’m afraid, in my humble opinion, discussion between the chambers and it will kick off pretty rapidly, I would imagine, next week,” said Price.

Lawmakers return to Raleigh on Monday after deciding to take a week long vacation, despite having missed their June 30 budget deadline.

One Comment


  1. Morning Post for July 10, 2015

    July 10, 2015 at 9:30 am

    […] certainty to schools, but as the school year nears that is not the case, says DPI finance chief. Read more and […]

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