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Just in: House, Senate reach deal on teacher & state employee pay raises

*This post has been updated to reflect comments from Senate budget writer Harry Brown indicating that all state employees AND teachers will receive $750 bonuses during the 2015-16 fiscal year.

The News & Observer is reporting that House and Senate leaders have reached an agreement on how much to pay teachers and state employees for this fiscal year, nearly two months after their June 30 deadline for making these decisions.

All state employees, including teachers, will receive $750 bonuses toward the end of 2015, said Sen. Harry Brown (R-Onslow). That amounts to $62.50 per month, before taxes.

Making good on last year’s promise, beginning teachers will also see their base pay rise to $35,000 per year, up from $33,000 that was enacted last year.

Experienced teachers will also receive step increases, presumably as laid out in the state’s streamlined salary schedule, which lawmakers enacted last year—although budget documents detailing the step increases were not made available Wednesday. (See here for the 2014-15 salary schedule.)

It’s unclear whether teachers who are scheduled for step increases as well as beginning teachers will be paid retroactively beginning with the July 1 start of the fiscal year.

A spokeswoman for House Speaker Tim Moore said their priority will be to focus on “shoring up funds so we can give meaningful raises” next year, according to the N&O.

For a teacher with 15 years of experience and a bachelor’s degree, receiving a step increase will mean jumping up from a base salary of $40,000 to $43,500 (excluding local supplements). Step increases for teachers are scheduled every five years, stopping at year 25 and capping base salary at $50,000.

WRAL reports that budget negotiators are still discussing how much of a pay increase to give state retirees. And there’s no resolution yet about teacher assistants—the Senate wants to slash 8,500+ TA jobs in exchange for reducing classroom size, while the House wants to preserve those positions.

House Speaker Tim Moore announced Wednesday that the General Assembly will pass a third continuing resolution tomorrow. The measure, which will keep state government operations running as lawmakers finalize a budget, will run through September 18—although they hope to reach a final agreement sooner, at which time the above mentioned raises & bonuses will be set in law.

18 Comments


  1. JBnNC

    August 26, 2015 at 3:48 pm

    “bonuses”, not raises. The war on retirement continues.

  2. Tommy White

    August 26, 2015 at 4:02 pm

    So no pay raises unless you are at a 5 year interval & $50 a month for all other employees after taxes. I bet the Health Insurance goes up more than that. But hey the coporations need another tax break, they didn’t get a big enough break last year.

  3. Heidi

    August 26, 2015 at 5:28 pm

    Nothing for other school district employees AGAIN?? Why are state employees any more important than other categories of school district employees?? Not even token bonus days?

  4. Pertains!

    August 26, 2015 at 6:05 pm

    It is a shame we can not put a cap on their income.
    None of their funded by tax payers to attend private school children or grand children will ever be encouraged to be teachers.

  5. Robin harden

    August 26, 2015 at 6:54 pm

    They obviously have no respect for veteran teachers who have invested their heart , so and finances to pubic Ed. My longevity pay which they took was twice this crumb they are throwing. So sad and depressing.

  6. Jacob Jacobs

    August 26, 2015 at 7:46 pm

    The Republicans’ war on public education is not going to end until public education is destroyed and all of their corporate buddies are making a profit on private schools at the taxpayer’s expense. States who have gone down this path are having disastrous results with their educational systems. The ONE AND ONLY SOLUTION IS TO VOTE REPUBLICANS OUT OF OFFICE IN NC IN 2016. Say what you will about the Democrats, but the worst Democrat is better than the Republicans when it come to governing our state.

  7. Luanne Graham

    August 26, 2015 at 10:46 pm

    Tell me how it is fair that teachers with only 15 years experience and just a bachelor’s degree get just $6,500 less than teachers with 25+ years experience and a master’s degree? That’s right, it’s not. It’s stuff like this that makes me wish for a hell that they could all rot in…slowly.

  8. Sharon

    August 27, 2015 at 12:01 am

    How about a budget plan that respects teachers and TAs. Assistants are vital parts to the success of our students! They work for less than half of what a new teacher makes. If a new teacher comes in at 35k a year and they should! A ta is making aprox. 14k a year. Many work hours off the clock and let’s face it many are doing the exact job teachers are doing minus meetings and red tape. How about we stop treating the TA like they don’t matter and actually pay them what they are worth! And budget this state as if education was a real priority to the politicians and not just a stand to take during elections.

  9. John

    August 27, 2015 at 1:33 am

    Regular state employee’s need a raise too. Bonus helps but it does not count as salary and is a one time payment. Teachers should not be the only people that get a raise. Once again it seems that regular rank and file state employee’s get screwed again in the name of teachers and education.

  10. Geno

    August 27, 2015 at 6:17 am

    Another slap in the face to hard working veterans that put up with their disrespect year after year. Many of us are going to retire early and end it. We’ve had enough. That’s what they want anyway. Let them staff the classrooms with their 35,000 newbies – but they will have no mentors. Good luck.

  11. Laurie Caravaglio

    August 27, 2015 at 7:05 am

    Why everyone complaining when teachers have not had a raise in years. Btw, nerther have those that wirk in the private sector. Perhaps we should go back to pay cuts?

  12. Pamela Gilliard

    August 27, 2015 at 8:46 am

    Its a shame that we have merged and are now being called NC Department of Public Safety but the only ones getting a raise are the Highway Patrol. I work in a prison and have been for the last 10 years. We risk our lives and sanity for the safety of the general public but are the last ones that they even think about.

  13. David Blank

    August 27, 2015 at 10:56 am

    In response to Ms Caravaglio; When one places a comment on the state of education and the worth of educators in general, one should know how to spell and structure a sentence. Ms Caravaglio, you are a glaring example of the importance of an education. I am sure if funding doesn’t improve there will be fewer people out there that recognize our educational shortcomings.

  14. Mark

    August 27, 2015 at 5:13 pm

    While it may not be everything every teacher deserves, these are more proactive steps than the Democratic party took while running the show. Ignorance believes otherwise.

  15. Sam Smith

    August 27, 2015 at 8:06 pm

    Oh, my goodness. I’m not quite certain, but some of you sound like grade school students.

    To the one who wants all republicans voted out. Have you not yet figured out there are no real sides. The Rep vs Dem is a game to give us something to occupy our time, keep our focus away from real issues (same with sports) and give us a sense, albeit false, that our vote matters. Do you ever wonder who is truly running the show?

    To the one who wants someone(s) to rot in hell because the system is not fair. Seriously? Who taught you that life was fair? If you missed that lesson, you now have heard that life is not fair. Also, wishing anyone to be damned to eternal hell is nothing that should come from anyone’s mouth, particularly an adult involved with developing our precious youth.

  16. Sam Smith

    August 27, 2015 at 8:12 pm

    A quick add on – I really don’t care to offend anyone. I’ve said those things and had those feelings of intense frustration myself. Fortunately for everyone, not a school teacher. I hold teachers in a particularly high regard.

    Getting older has it’s downfalls and lots of them. Experience and wisdom is one of the few perks. Take care everyone and please try not to take life so deadly seriously. Keep your chin up!

  17. Sam Smith

    August 27, 2015 at 8:14 pm

    PS. I failed English. I’m sorry for being such a pistol, Mrs. Rood.

  18. Tammy

    September 4, 2015 at 10:06 am

    My husband has a Bachelor Degree in criminal justice and has been with the prison system for 22 years. He has more education than most of the leadership he works under.I believe that all state employees deserve the same raise. All the jobs are important.

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