Commentary

Must read: The utter folly of sandbagging the NC coast

If you had any doubts about the futility and long-term destructiveness of propping up well-heeled property owners along the North Carolina coast with sandbags and so-called “terminal groins” of the kind favored by the well-heeled property owners who run the North Carolina General Assembly and the McCrory administration, read this excellent essay in today’s edition of Raleigh’s News & Observer by coastal geology Prof. Rob Young. As Young explains:

“Is North Topsail Beach the most poorly managed beach community in the country? If not, it certainly seems to be taking a good shot at it. I have watched in dismay as the town has struggled to preserve a small stretch of oceanfront property at all costs. In doing so, officials have destroyed their beach and created significant access issues along more than a half-mile stretch of shoreline. Perhaps even more disconcerting is that this damage has been done with the permission of the N.C. Division of Coastal Management and the N.C. Coastal Resources Commission.”

But wait, it gets worse:
“I fear that the story of North Topsail Beach may become the story of coastal management in many North Carolina communities. Lax oversight and a desire to return decision-making to the localities will prove to be economically disastrous and waste public funds. The best example is the most recent. North Topsail Beach was given a Public Beach and Waterfront Access grant to build a parking lot to improve public access to the beach (it’s hard to climb over all those sandbags). The parking lot was constructed this spring. It is already falling into the sea.”
And here is the excellent conclusion:

“Ultimately, it is time for the residents of North Topsail Beach and similar communities to understand that protecting the oceanfront at all costs is not fair to the vast majority of property owners whose homes are in more reasonable locations. How much personnel time and real dollars has the town had to spend to protect a very small part of its tax base? And how has the complete degradation of the public beach (everyone’s economic resource) affected property values, rental income and the visitor experience?

It is also time for the CRC and the DCM to take a hard look at the variances they grant. Protecting the property values of some can seriously degrade the amenity that others expect. Coastal communities are far more than that one line of oceanfront homes.

North Carolina was once the national leader in wise coastal management. Look at the northern end of NTB and decide whether this is the vision we have for the fate of all North Carolina beaches. I surely hope not.”

Click here to read Young’s entire essay.

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