NC Budget and Tax Center

Costly tax cuts drain resources for investments in NC’s education pipeline

A report released today by Budget & Tax Center highlights that state support for early childhood development, public schools, and public colleges and universities remains below investment levels prior to the Great Recession. This trend will persist under the current budget passed by state lawmakers that North Carolinians must live through until July of 2017. The annual cost of tax cuts in 2015 balloons to over $1 billion each year within four years, and comes on top of costly tax cuts passed by state lawmakers in 2013.

Ensuring high-quality learning and education opportunities for all North Carolina children and students remains a challenge as the student population grows and best practices in the classroom evolve. The BTC report highlights areas of inadequate investment in North Carolina’s education pipeline.

  • State funding for NC Pre-K is 15 percent lower when adjusted for inflation than the 2009 budget year, when funding and the number of children served peaked. This year, more than 6,400 fewer state-funded slots are available in NC Pre-K than in 2009 despite more than 7,200 children being on NC Pre-K wait lists last year.
  • State support for the Smart Start program, which promotes school readiness for North Carolina children from birth to age five, is nearly 40 percent below 2009 when adjusted for inflation.
  • State funding per-pupil for public K-12 schools is nearly 9 percent below its 2008 pre-recession funding level when adjusted for inflation.
  • Compared to peak funding in the 2008 budget year, state support per student at four-year public universities this year is down nearly 16 percent while tuition have increased significantly during this time period.
  • Tuition at community colleges has increased by 81 percent since 2009.

The report highlights other areas of diminished and lagging support for public education – the decline in state funding for classroom textbooks, for example – and how state lawmakers shifted existing state dollars from one area to another to make state support for public education appear more generous than in reality.

Public investments in early childhood development, quality public schools, and affordable higher education are essential building blocks of long-term economic growth and shared prosperity. Yet amid an uneven and slow economic recovery, state policymakers chose to deliver greater benefits to the wealthiest few rather than boosting investments in its education pipeline to ensure access to opportunity for all North Carolina children and students, the report notes.

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