NC Budget and Tax Center

Revenue is up but North Carolina still falls short

Revenue remains up in North Carolina. This isn’t surprising as the national and state economies are growing. Revenue collections are expected to be $237 million above projections for this fiscal year, which is welcome news. However, as previously highlighted, this better-than-anticipated revenue does not mean we have adequate revenue to meet the needs and priorities of a growing state.

Costly income tax cuts enacted in 2013 greatly reduced revenue for public investment – reducing annual revenue by around $1 billon. Last year, state lawmakers passed more tax cuts that, once all tax changes are fully in place, will reduce annual revenue by more than $2 billion. These are dollars that otherwise would be available for public schools, affordable higher education, healthcare services for the elderly and poor, and helping ensure that economic growth extends to rural and distressed communities across the state.

The projected $237 million in better-then-anticipated revenue falls far short of what’s needed to adequately address challenges we face as a state. Getting average pay for North Carolina teachers closer to the national average, reducing Pre-K waitlists that totaled more than 7,200 children last year, helping promote economic growth in rural and distressed communities, and improving the states foster care system are among challenges that require additional state funding support. Many other challenges exist – ensuring affordable higher education and a growing elderly population – that have implications on the economic health and overall quality of life for North Carolinians.

While better-than-anticipated revenue is welcome news, such news does not serve as validation of costly tax cuts passed in recent years. Nor does this news mean that North Carolina is positioned for broadly shared economic prosperity in the years ahead. Rather, concern about whether our state will truly be able to keep up with the needs in a growing state that seeks to remain competitive and an attractive place to live should continue.

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