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During Pledge of Allegiance debate, N.C. school district talks students’ right to protest

Students reciting the Pledge of Allegiance

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University protests have been hotly debated in recent months, but there’s been little talk of students’ right to protest in K-12 schools.

But today, take the time to read an interesting report in The News & Observer about one North Carolina school district’s debate of how it would handle protests like the one that spurred so many headlines last month at East Carolina University.

The debate came about as school board members in Johnston County, a rural district just outside of the Triangle, adopted state-mandated tweaks to the requirement that schools give students the chance to say the Pledge of Allegiance.

Students will not be required to participate if they opt out of reciting the pledge.

From the N&O:

In light of East Carolina University marching band members taking a knee during the national anthem, Johnston school leaders wondered how they would respond to similar displays.

“I can see this happening at schools like it’s happened in the university setting,” school board member Keith Branch said. “If you’re a member of the marching band and you’re out there on the field, can the director not require the kids to play during the national anthem instead of just standing there not playing or taking a knee or whatever they’re doing?”

Johnston Superintendent Ross Renfrow, conferring with school system attorney Jimmy Lawrence, said it depends.

“When you’re in school garb, you’re representing the school, whether you’re in a band uniform or basketball uniform, or volleyball,” Ross Renfrow said. “I do know that in the situation in Greenville, those students continued to play even though they were kneeling. They were participating; they were just not participating standing up.”

As much as public protests, some school board members were concerned about indifference toward the pledge or a perceived lack of respect.

As one district administrator cited in the report notes, there’s a balance to be struck for local school districts.

Read on from the N&O:

One Comment


  1. Laurie

    November 8, 2016 at 1:16 pm

    I believe it is also important to note that not all who do not participate to strict tradition are actually protesting. Some opt out due to religious reasons, and this is why school districts do not make it compulsory. And these students deserve to be respected as well.

    We sometimes forget to remind parents the whole history is indeed part of decision making process when trying to establish a policy.

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