Commentary, Trump Administration

Small town NC newspaper explains why Trumpism won’t help rural America

There was a fine editorial yesterday from the Elizabeth City Daily Advance about the tragic decision of so many rural Americans to vote against their own interest by electing Donald Trump. In “Rural America loves Trump; too bad he doesn’t love it,” the editorial reviews the fears that voters in rural areas understandably harbor and then explores how and why so many fell for the “hokum” Trump was selling. Here’s the fine conclusion:

“The real tragedy of rural Americans voting in such overwhelming numbers to put Donald Trump in the White House is that there will be no programmatic or legislative payoff for their votes. Despite aggressively stumping in their communities and promising things he can’t deliver, the fate of small-town Americans is not among Trump’s top priorities. The same is true for Republicans who will hold the majorities in both the House and Senate.

As evidence of this, Trump and congressional Republicans have vowed to make their first priority not a major infrastructure spending bill that could put many rural Americans to work. Instead, they’ve set their sights on repealing the Affordable Health Care Act, a measure that’s been good for rural Americans because it’s allowed many of them, thanks to taxpayer-backed subsidies, to finally be able to purchase affordable health care insurance.

Trump and congressional Republicans also have no interest in passing an increase in the minimum wage or making college costs more affordable — two things that also could greatly improve rural Americans’ lives. Expect them to instead focus on bigger tax cuts for the wealthy and on rolling back banking and other regulations adopted after the financial collapse that will make corporate America’s life easier.

We’d like to think that it wouldn’t take long for rural America to realize it’s been hoodwinked and demand that their champion turn his focus to them. But then, Trump has already taken the measure of those who support him the most fervently. He famously once said during the campaign that he “could shoot somebody and would not lose voters.” Right now, we’re not so sure the same won’t happen when Trump gets in the White House and begins pursuing his real passion: furthering the  interests of Donald Trump.”

Click here to read the entire editorial.

2 Comments


  1. HunterC

    November 14, 2016 at 9:53 am

    This post embodies the Democratic failure in NC and DC. Blaming voters for not voting in their self-interest is a scapegoating tool for the political class that has been around for decades.

    It’s not on the voters; it’s on the failed team. The voters were no more sold hokum than the Democrats failed to recognize what the voters wanted to hear.

    Voters aren’t stupid. Failed campaigns and candidate are.

    Only when a candidate, party or campaign grasps that basic fact will they become an elected majority again.

  2. Donald

    November 14, 2016 at 10:09 am

    Hunterc: It can be both. Clinton wasn’t a great candidate and didn’t run a great campaign. Trump lied, and lied, and lied.

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