News, Special Session

NCGA Special Session Day 2: When the levee breaks

After a relatively uneventful first day of the North Carolina General Assembly’s special session…well, the levee broke.

The GOP supermajority in the NCGA had been saying this week they didn’t intend to go beyond disaster relief in this session. So, having passed the disaster relief bill that prompted the extra session, the Republicans decided to end the session and begin a new one. And in this new one…well, they’re doing so many things.

By the time the N.C. House adjourned at just before 8 p.m. there were 21 bills filed in the House and 7 in the Senate.

Most of the bills in some way grant final political advantages to outgoing Republican Gov. Pat McCrory, curtail the power and influence of incoming Democratic Governor-Elect Roy Cooper, consolidate political power under GOP elected officials or appointees or attempt push through GOP priorities they couldn’t accomplish during the last full session.

Among the bills filed Wednesday:

* House Bill 17, which would strip the incoming governor of many of his appointment powers, dramatically reduce the number of employees who he may hire or fire and make even his cabinet appointments Senate confirmable.

* Senate Bill 4, which would re-make the State Board of Elections in a manner that prevents Cooper from appointing a majority of the board’s members, make State Supreme Court and Appeals Court races partisan and make it more difficult for cases to reach the state’s highest court, which with November’s non-partisan election now has a majority of judges who are Democrats.

*Senate Bills 6 and 7, which allow confirmation of two Special Superior Court judges appointed by McCrory before he leaves office. The appointees are conservative Charlotte attorney Adam Conrad and Andrew Heath, who now serves as McCrory’s budget director.

* House Bill 3, a scaled-back version of a regulatory reform bill that didn’t get passed in the regular session. Among its provisions: allowing cars and trucks in 25 counties to forego emissions testing.

Committee meetings on the bill begin Thursday morning and legislative leaders are now saying the session is likely to stretch to Friday.

Strap in – we’re likely to see a few more surprises before the session ends.

One Comment


  1. Robert Long View

    December 15, 2016 at 12:46 am

    How the Grinch stole Christmas, no doubt. About politics, foul-mouth John Boehner said so succinctly back in 2011 — chicken salad, er salet!

Check Also

Bill filed to defy Supreme Court ruling, oppose same-sex marriage in N.C.

Three Republican lawmakers filed a bill in the ...

Top Stories from NCPW

  • News
  • Commentary

President Trump’s national emergency declaration, long teased, is in effect. Let the lawsuits begin. [...]

The EPA today announced it has issued a Notice of Violation to Chemours for failing to comply, on mu [...]

If you told Cheri Beasley when she was a little girl that she would grow up to become North Carolina [...]

President Trump’s top disaster management official, Brock Long, resigned as head of the Federal Emer [...]

Editor's note: Kim Mackey is a social studies teacher with Wake County Public Schools. She rece [...]

The post Sending his love… appeared first on NC Policy Watch. [...]

Surely, it would be folly to suggest that ICE’s hardened reputation as a home-wrecker was earned by [...]

There’s an old maxim in American politics, usually attributed to former U.S. Senator and Nixon admin [...]