Commentary, News

Governor Cooper’s teacher pay plan explained

As WRAL.com reported this afternoon, Gov. Roy Cooper proposed a new teacher pay plan  today that seeks to get North Carolina to the national average in five years:

Gov. Roy Cooper said Monday that his proposed budget will include 5 percent raises for public school teachers in each of the next two years and laid out a plan to bring teacher pay in North Carolina to the national average within five years.

“These aren’t just investments in our teachers. They are lasting investments in our economy and in our own children’s future,” Cooper said at an event at Collinswood Language Academy in Charlotte. “Education is part of North Carolina’s legacy, but recently we’ve fallen behind. My proposal is a serious, multi-year increase in teacher salaries that will get us to the national average so we can show our teachers the respect they deserve.”

North Carolina currently ranks 41st nationally in average teacher salary.

Advocates at the North Carolina Association of Educators welcomed the announcement. This is from a statement released by the group.

“Governor Cooper’s two-year teacher pay proposal is a significant step toward restoring respect back to the profession and making North Carolina a teacher destination state once again. It also does not leave out our most experienced educators, which has been the case in recent years. The most valuable resource a student can have to help them be successful is a qualified, caring teacher in front of the class. Governor Cooper’s strong commitment to public education, educators, and students will make sure North Carolina can recruit and retain the qualified educators and gets North Carolina back on the right track.”

As part of the announcement, Cooper distributed a one-page fact sheet that spells out some of the details of the proposal. Click here to check it out.

2 Comments


  1. tuna tim

    February 21, 2017 at 2:04 am

    Are community college faculty ‘teachers’? I think they absolutely are, and I know that morale is really being tested every time talk of ‘teachers’ raises excludes them. The community colleges are hemorrhaging talented teachers, because they’ve practically been ignored over the last decade. The time is NOW to treat them the same as K-12 teachers.

  2. Phil Husar

    February 28, 2017 at 9:34 am

    I teach in both places ( high school and community college) and I agree completely. I’m being paid $2000 per course at the college and the amount of work is almost for a full time employee.

Check Also

League of Women Voters: NC congressional redistricting process remains flawed

Criticism of the congressional redistricting process that’s been ...

Top Stories from NCPW

  • News
  • Commentary

After a weeks-long storm of investigations, leaks and accusations of unethical behavior on North Car [...]

When it began in 1919, it was “Armistice Day” — a celebration of the end of World War I. It became a [...]

Peter Romary worked for UNC board member Tom Fetzer, but claimed connections to Senate leader Phil B [...]

GREENSBORO – A Pender County graduate almost missed an opportunity to pursue his dream job because h [...]

“The hymn in church yesterday,” Dan Gerlach, the embattled former ECU interim chancellor, tweeted Su [...]

Back in the early 1990’s, the late and sorely missed Bob Hensley – a talented, feisty and frequently [...]

The post Berger on shaky ground appeared first on NC Policy Watch. [...]

Today marks 100 days since I filed an official request with the Department of Public Instruction to [...]