Commentary

Chris Brook of the ACLU of NC speaks about HB2 litigation

At this past Thursday’s Crucial Conversation (“One year later: What now for HB2?”)  multiple audience members asked ACLU of NC legal director Chris Brook for his take on the impact of the Trump administration on HB2, as well as the broader question of what the fight over HB2 means for LGBTQ rights more generally.

“There’s a general interest in what’s going to happen next in the litigation. What is the the impact of our new administration in Washington? And are there aspects of the litigation that deal with the general issue of discrimination against LGBT people, not just about bathrooms, but in terms of employment, and housing, and accommodations.” – Rob Schofield

“The thing that I’ve been saying since the passage a year ago, is that we need to quit calling this “the bathroom bill.” We need to start calling it HB2. And that’s not because we need to be afraid of talking about bathrooms. We need to talk about bathrooms; we are going to win those arguments. It’s just inaccurate though!” – Chris Brook

 

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