NC Budget and Tax Center, Trump Administration

Three ways Trump’s “America First” budget puts hungry Americans last

When it comes to hunger, North Carolina stands out. Each night, almost 630,000 North Carolina households do not have enough to eat. With 15.9 percent of households being food insecure, North Carolina has the highest rate of hunger on the East Coast, and the 8th highest in the nation. Even amongst North Carolinians, hunger does not impact everyone equally. We know that children, households led by women, and seniors are far more likely to face issues of hunger.

While our state still has a long way to go in eliminating food insecurity, we have made strides in recent years. From 2013 to 2015, the state’s food insecurity rate dropped from 17.3 to 15.9 percent, largely in part to critical federal programs that help put food on the table for North Carolina’s most vulnerable. But with Trump’s proposed budget, these very programs are at risk for cuts and even elimination.

Here are three ways Trump’s budget threatens to increase hunger in North Carolina:

1. Cuts to the Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children

Trump’s budget cuts the Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children, known as WIC, by $200 million per year (from $6.4 billion to $6.2 billion). WIC provides healthy foods, formula and baby food, and health care support for pregnant and breastfeeding women, their infants, and children under the age of five. While this cut won’t kick off current participants, it will inhibit WIC’s ability to provide additional programming and services and could prevent WIC from serving new mothers and children in the future.

Last year, WIC served over 240,000 North Carolinian women and children each month and provided more than $123 million worth of food. In North Carolina, WIC has contributed to a drop in newborn Medicaid costs, increasing the likelihood of children receiving regular and preventative health services; lowered infant mortality rates; and is responsible for improved education performance for children.

2. Elimination of the Community Services Block Grant

The proposed budget completely eliminates the Community Services Block Grant (CSBG), a $718 million program, which supports local organizations working to alleviate poverty, hunger, and joblessness across the nation. In North Carolina, CSBG funds 35 Community Action Agencies that service 97 of NCs 100 counties, funneling nearly $21.5 million into high need rural, urban, and suburban communities. While CSBG funding supports a wide array of activities, one critical service is its role in providing emergency food assistance. These funds are used to organize and operate food banks, support North Carolina’s Meals on Wheels program, fund nutrition and food preparation counseling services, and even support community and urban gardens.

Nearly 40 percent of the 120,000 North Carolinians who are supported through CSBG funds are children, 20 percent are seniors, and more than 10 percent are individuals with disabilities.

3. Elimination of 21st Century Community Learning Centers

The budget seeks to eliminate 21st Century Community Learning Centers (21st CCLC), a $1.2 billion program that provides before-, after-, weekend-, and summer school academic enrichment. In North Carolina, this would mean a loss of $22.3 million to 68 school districts, local governments, and non-profits that currently operate these academic enrichment programs. Although increasing nutrition and access to food for children is not an explicit goal, these learning centers play a critical role in eliminating the food gap many children in North Carolina face. Last year, nearly 750,000 children in North Carolina received free or reduced-priced meals. Before and after school and during the summer, many of these children and their families are at risk of being food insecure. Meals provided at after school and summer enrichment programs are an extremely important and efficient tool at addressing childhood hunger.

The Trump Administration argues that 21st CCLC “lacks strong evidence of meeting its objective, such as improving student achievement.”. That’s not true. A 2014 evaluation of North Carolina’s 21st CCLC program proved that students who participated in the program saw larger and faster improvements on standardize testing scores than students who did not participate.

If we really want to make America great, we have to ensure that no American goes to bed hungry. Investing in these important and proven programs is critical for the health of our children, our economy, and our nation.

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